Business Professionals Sleeping Out for Homeless Youth

Some 50 up-and-coming professionals will spend the night of April 10 sleeping outside to raise awareness of youth homelessness and support for kids at Covenant House.

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“We feel there is a growing movement around this unique and experiential event to help our youth,” says Bruce Rivers, Covenant House Executive Director

Toronto, ON (PRWEB) March 28, 2014

Some 50 up-and-coming professionals will spend the night of April 10 sleeping outside to raise awareness of youth homelessness and support for kids at Covenant House.

Participants in the first-ever Covenant House Sleep Out: Next Generation will be equipped with only a sleeping bag and piece of cardboard to get a small glimpse of the hardships youth can face on the street.

Joining the group will be Lawrence Krimker, a self-made millionaire by the age of 25 who runs his own company promoting healthy living and sustainability and restaurateur, Trevor Wilkinson, who is providing placement opportunities for Covenant House culinary arts program graduates at his establishments.

“We are thrilled and grateful for the enthusiastic response from the next generation of business and community leaders for this new version of our sleep out event,” says Bruce Rivers, Covenant House Executive Director. “We feel there is a growing movement around this unique and experiential event to help our youth.”

The Covenant House Sleep Out: Next Generation builds on the agency’s hugely successful Executive Sleep Out that has raised more than $1.3 million in the past two years.

Next Generation participants are putting their networking skills into high gear to raise $100,000 for the agency’s work with homeless youth.

As the country’s largest homeless youth agency, Covenant House provides 24/7 crisis shelter and a longer-term residential program along with comprehensive services, including education, counselling, health care, employment assistance and job training to some 3,000 youth annually. To do all this, the agency relies on donors for 80 percent of its $20-million annual operating budget.


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