London Behind In Global Race - Bikes Now Faster Than Cars

WeLoveAnyCar.com, the UK’s biggest car review site, crunches new Department of Transport figures and finds bikes go faster in Camden than cars. With an average speed of less than 9.5 MPH, car ownership is falling in London.

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155 MPH Porsche In Camden With Average 9.5 MPH in Camden, London

(PRWEB UK) 31 March 2014

Department of Transport figures released on 13th February, highlight a growing problem in the world's leading city; London.

London Boroughs responsible for local 'A' roads are losing the global race in transport efficiency as the average speed of cars in the Capital falls below cyclists.

Camden is the slowest Borough according to measurements issued by the Department of Transport.

WeLoveAnyCar.com analysed the Department's monthly figures by each individual 'A' road then averaged these out over 12 months by Local Authority or Borough. All figures were based on the speeds of cars from 7am to 10am on individual roads measured by Department of Transport officials. Whilst they say their figures are 'experimental', they have been collecting data for more than 6 years on over 4000 stretches of 'A' roads.

The top ten slowest road networks were all in London Boroughs with Camden vehicle owners averaging road speeds of just 9.5 MPH over a 12 month period.

Close behind in the slowest road tables were the City of London and Islington. However virtually all the London Boroughs are bottom of the vehicle speed lists.

The fastest Local Authority was Rutland. The slowest road in England over 12 months was Tottenham Court Road.

David Titmuss of WeLoveAnyCar.com said, “We track average top speeds by car by area and our database runs into millions. We found some of the fastest cars are owned by people who live in the slowest Boroughs in London."

Car ownership is declining in many major cities and this new analysis gives an insight into why commuters are increasingly turning to the bike, bus, train and even choosing to walk.

"Soon walking could be faster than car in London if the trends in the data continue," said the WeLoveAnyCar.com spokesman.


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