Noel-Levitz Releases Ninth Annual National Freshman Attitudes Report Based on 100,000 College Freshmen

Noel-Levitz has released its annual National Freshman Attitudes Report, providing data on incoming college students’ needs, motivations, and non-cognitive attitudes that influence their success in college and rates of college completion. The report is based on a national sample of more than 100,000 college freshmen in 2013 who completed a 100-item survey.

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Ninth annual Freshman Attitudes Report

Ninth annual National Freshman Attitudes Report released.

Coralville, Iowa (PRWEB) April 03, 2014

Noel-Levitz has released its annual National Freshman Attitudes Report, providing data on incoming college students’ needs, motivations, and non-cognitive attitudes that influence their success in college and rates of college completion. The report is based on a national sample of more than 100,000 college freshmen in 2013 who completed a 100-item survey.

This year’s report highlights incoming students’ needs and desires for career planning assistance.

A few highlights:

  •     Upon their arrival on campus, 47 percent of incoming freshmen last year wanted career counseling.
  •     Just over 21 percent of entering freshmen reported being “very confused” about which career occupation to pursue.
  •     The majority of entering freshmen in the study (67 percent) wanted help with developing an educational plan “to get a good job.”
  •     93 percent of incoming female freshmen, vs. 88 percent of incoming male freshmen, expressed a greater commitment to completing their educational goals.
  •     Nearly 40 percent of incoming first-generation freshmen face greater financial challenges.
  •     Compared to White/Caucasian freshmen, incoming students of color brought higher degree aspirations beyond a bachelor’s.
  •     Compared to White/Caucasian freshmen, incoming students of color also indicated a greater desire to receive 25 institutional services that were measured in the study.
  •     Although their commitment to college was strong, nearly 40 percent of incoming first-generation freshmen reported having “financial problems that are very distracting and troublesome.”
  •     Incoming freshmen ages 25 and older were clearer on their career direction than their younger counterparts, but 41 percent of these older students still wanted career counseling.

"When entering students share the issues that are on their minds, we learn how to make a noticeable, positive difference during their initial days and weeks on campus," notes Dr. Mari Normyle, assistant vice president of retention solutions for Noel-Levitz. “These findings help colleges and universities align their resources and services to immediately address the needs of the incoming class."

The Noel-Levitz study, titled 2014 National Freshman Attitudes Report, includes an Addendum by Race/Ethnicity and eight suggestions for responding to students’ needs and desires for career planning assistance. For a copy of the 20-page report and its 8-page addendum, visit http://www.noellevitz.com/Freshmen.

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Noel-Levitz is a recognized leader in higher education consulting and research. For 40 years, they have partnered with more than 2,800 campuses to optimize enrollment management and student success through experienced consultation, advanced analytic tools, and campus assessments.


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