ISHLT Releases First Guidelines on Anti-Fungal Prophylaxis for Cardiothoracic Transplant Recipients

Guidelines Strongly Recommend the Institution of Specific Anti-Fungal Prophylactic Strategies

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“We have broken many myths about fungal infections in these specific patient populations,” said Dr. Husain, Associate Professor of Medicine and Director of Transplant Infectious Diseases at the University of Toronto.

San Diego, CA (PRWEB) April 13, 2014

The International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) will release today the first guidelines on anti-fungal prophylaxis for the prevention of invasive fungal infections after cardiothoracic transplantation. The consensus report contains a comprehensive review including guidelines and recommendations concerning treatment of anti-fungal infections in this group. The report was developed by the ISHLT Infectious Disease Council and is designed to become the standard reference document concerning these types of infections.

Despite advancements in cardiothoracic transplantation, fungal infections continue to be a significant cause of mortality, prompting the institution of center-specific anti-fungal prophylactic strategies. The guidelines will be presented by co-chair and corresponding author, Dr. Shahid Husain, Associate Professor of Medicine and Director of Transplant Infectious Diseases at the University of Toronto. Dr. Husain will discuss the global expert panel’s recommendations that address the most relevant questions in areas of fungal epidemiology, diagnosis, prophylaxis, and treatment including therapeutic drug monitoring of anti-fungal agents in heart, lung, and mechanical circulatory support (MCS) device patients.

“We have broken many myths about fungal infections in these specific patient populations,” said Dr. Husain. “This is the first document to standardize the administration of antifungal prophylaxis in these complex patients and identifies future avenues of research in this field,” he continues. Instead of a “one-size-fits-all” approach, special consideration has been given to local epidemiology. Use of diagnostic serological makers has been highlighted with a particular emphasis on risk-stratified strategies for prophylactic anti-mold agents.

The International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) is a not-for-profit professional organization with more than 2,700 members from over 45 countries dedicated to improving the core of patients with advanced heart or lung disease through transplantation, mechanical support and innovative therapies via research, education and advocacy. For more information, visit http://www.ishlt.org.


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