Medical Costs per Claim for Injured Workers in Indiana Were Higher and Rising Faster Than Most in 16-State WCRI Study

This WCRI study, CompScope™ Medical Benchmarks for Indiana 14th Edition, examines medical costs, prices, and utilization in Indiana and compares it with 15 other states. It further examines how these metrics of medical costs and care have changed from 2006 to 2011 (evaluated in 2012).

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Sample chart from the study.

Sample chart from the study.

Future studies will help policymakers measure the effectiveness of the reforms on the costs and growth of medical care for injured workers in Indiana.

CAMBRIDGE, MA (PRWEB) April 14, 2014

The costs per claim of medical care for injured workers in Indiana were higher than most states and growing faster, according to a new 16-state report from the Workers Compensation Research Institute (WCRI).

The study, CompScope™ Medical Benchmarks for Indiana 14th Edition, found the main reason for higher medical payments per claim was higher and growing prices, like other states with no price regulation. Lower to typical utilization of medical care helped to offset the higher prices paid.

Higher costs per claim for hospital care were an important factor in the higher overall medical costs per claim in Indiana, especially for outpatient services. Hospital payments were among the highest of the study states, at nearly $12,000 per 2010 claim evaluated in 2012. Higher prices and inpatient payments were the main reasons for that result.

The study noted that recent legislation in Indiana addressed hospital costs, a key driver of higher medical payments, by enacting a hospital fee schedule, effective in 2014.

“Future studies will help policymakers measure the effectiveness of the reforms on the costs and growth of medical care for injured workers in Indiana,” said Ramona Tanabe, WCRI’s deputy director and counsel.

Medical payments per workers’ compensation claim in Indiana grew 8 percent per year, on average, from 2006 to 2011, faster than in other states.

Click on the following link to purchase a copy of this study: http://www.wcrinet.org/result/csmed14_IN_result.html.

A webinar on this report will also be held on April 17, 2014. For more information visit: http://www.wcrinet.org/4.17.14_webbriefing_More.html.

The Cambridge-based WCRI is recognized as a leader in providing high-quality, objective information about public policy issues involving workers' compensation systems.

ABOUT WCRI:

The Workers Compensation Research Institute (WCRI) is an independent, not-for-profit research organization based in Cambridge, MA. Since 1983, WCRI has been a catalyst for significant improvements in workers' compensation systems around the world with its objective, credible, and high-quality research. WCRI's members include employers; insurers; governmental entities; managed care companies; health care providers; insurance regulators; state labor organizations; and state administrative agencies in the U.S., Canada, Australia, and New Zealand.


Contact

  • Andrew Kenneally
    Workers Compensation Research Institute
    +1 (617) 661-9274 Ext: 257
    Email

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