Bloomsbury Films Offers Top Tips for Perfect Jewish Wedding Photography

Jewish weddings have a range of traditions that the professional photographer will need to bear in mind – Bloomsbury Films explains the key details for success.

  • Share on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on PinterestEmail a friend

Bloomsbury Films

We have filmed Jewish wedding events where the couple have chosen a leading photographer, but ended up suffering immense disappointment because the professional is unaware of the traditions and crucial moments that need to be captured.

(PRWEB UK) 10 April 2014

Bloomsbury Jewish wedding filming has earned a tried-and-tested reputation for excellence, which is why the company would like couples to benefit from their experience and expertise when it comes to choosing the right photographer to capture the Big Day perfectly.

If the chosen photographer is not Jewish, they will not be aware that there are two distinct types of Jewish wedding, with each having key moments that the photographer will need to be prepared to capture:

Secular Jewish Wedding

This type of wedding will typically need approximately three hours of photography for the first phase, where photos will be wanted of the wedding couple, their family and the wedding party. The photographer must also be ready to capture the gathering of close friends and family for the signing of the Hebrew and civil marriage licenses.

Thereafter, for around 20-30 minutes the guests will gather for the ceremony. The photographer should use this time to setup his/her cameras to capture the elaborate cocktail reception – this is a perfect time for photos of the happy couple with their parents and friends.

The photographer must then be ready for the seated dinner or buffet with dancing intermixed for around 4-5 hours, including capturing the traditional blessing made over a loaf of challah bread prior to the meal. Bloomsbury advises that the couple inform the professional to also be sure to capture their official entrance to the banquet room, followed by their first dance as husband and wife. Photos from multiple angles will be ideal.

Other important moments the photographer must not miss include the traditional Jewish hora (circle dance), the toast and speeches, the cutting of the wedding cake and the traditional parent dances.

Religious/Orthodox Jewish Wedding

Firstly, the photographer will need to know beforehand that an orthodox Jewish wedding means the bride and groom will usually not pose together for the portrait stage before the ceremony - they will only want more intimate photos together after the ceremony is over and the guests await their entrance.

Bloomsbury further suggests the couple inform the photographer of the kabbalat panim (reception) – they will have to have a team setup to capture both the male and female gatherings, and they must be sure to photograph the signing of the tenai’m (engagement contract) and the ketubah (marriage contract). Also inform them that they must immortalise the breaking of the glass plate.

Director of Bloomsbury Jewish wedding filming, Andrew Cussens, concluded: “We have filmed Jewish wedding events where the couple have chosen a leading photographer, but ended up suffering immense disappointment because the professional is unaware of the traditions and crucial moments that need to be captured. We hope that our tips give expectant brides and grooms the key details they need to tell the photographer, and we also suggest that people make a comprehensive list of every moment they deem essential to immortalising their Special Day.”


Contact

Follow us on: Contact's Facebook Contact's Twitter