Village of Ossining Showcases Economic Development Activity and Opportunities at Hudson Valley Main Street Summit

On April 17, The Community Preservation Corporation (CPC) hosted its latest Hudson Valley Main Street Summit, “Downtown Redevelopment Strategies,” in the Village of Ossining. Presented in partnership with the Village and Historic Hudson River Towns, the highly attended conference featured local industry panelists analyzing the latest downtown trends and Main Street redevelopment throughout the region using Ossining as a model community.

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Martin Ginsburg, Ginsburg Development Companies; Ingrid Richards, Village of Ossining; Jerry Faiella, Historic Hudson River Towns; Mayor William R. Hanauer; Doug Olcott, Community Preservation Corp.

The Village is in the midst of a renaissance of economic development – our present period of growth has been unmatched since the 1870s.

Ossining, NY (PRWEB) April 22, 2014

On April 17, The Community Preservation Corporation (CPC) hosted its latest Hudson Valley Main Street Summit, “Downtown Redevelopment Strategies,” in the Village of Ossining. Presented in partnership with the Village and Historic Hudson River Towns, the highly attended conference featured local industry panelists analyzing the latest downtown trends and Main Street redevelopment throughout the region using Ossining as a model community.

Mary S. Paden, Vice President of CPC, welcomed attendees on behalf of the organization and spoke of CPC’s dedication to building strong, sustainable communities by developing and preserving quality affordable housing. Village of Ossining Mayor William Hanauer and Ingrid Richards, Manager of Downtown and Economic Development, underlined the many steps Ossining has made in an effort to revitalize its downtown. The Village showcased exciting recent activity as well as opportunities for retailers and developers.

“The Village is in the midst of a renaissance of economic development – our present period of growth has been unmatched since the 1870s,” said Mayor Hanauer. “New housing is available at all levels of affordability and new space being prepared for new commercial establishments to cater to the needs of current and future residents.”

Nestled along the Hudson River, Ossining is a culturally diverse and affordable place to live, rich in both history and natural beauty. Approximately 25,600 people reside in the three and one half square miles of this historic Village, which boasts extensive shopping, dining, recreational programs, educational enrichment opportunities, and excellent municipal services.

The Village of Ossining is particularly attractive for young professionals and empty nesters looking for a combination of affordable living, waterfront views, and convenience with easy access to mass transit and New York City a mere 45 minutes away. Families can establish roots with an award-winning school system, close proximity to a variety of employment opportunities, and reasonable property taxes.

“Ossining is ideal for anyone interested in living in an urban, yet historic community,” said Richards. “For residents and business owners alike, Ossining is arguably the highest return on investment in Westchester. We are focused on equitable community development and strive to create a sustainable foundation for retail business and a local marketplace.”

Several mixed-use residential developments, including a new five-story brick and masonry building at 147-155 Main Street and the much-anticipated luxury apartment community Avalon Ossining, continue to revitalize the historic Village by bringing additional luxury, market and affordable rental units to the downtown and retail corridors. Harbor Square, a second luxury rental community, is now under construction and scheduled to open in spring 2016.

Plans are also moving forward for the creative development of Ossining’s Market Square. In addition to significant residential and retail square footage, both concepts currently under consideration include a new major public space for the community to gather (view concepts here and here). Public input workshops will be scheduled in the coming months to further discuss the relationship between retail and public space.

“Ever since CPC’s Hudson Valley office moved to Ossining, we have been overwhelmed by the warm welcoming from the Village and the local community,” said Doug Olcott, Senior Vice President and Director of CPC's Hudson Valley Region. “The conference served as an ideal gateway to continue the conversation and meet new local partners who share the commitment to downtown revitalization.”

Recognized nationally as a leader in affordable housing finance, CPC has contributed to the preservation or creation of over 157,000 units of affordable housing, initiated numerous downtown revitalizations, and improved the quality and energy efficiency of the multifamily stock.

Five presentations rounded out the Hudson Valley Main Street Summit and included:

  •     “Snapshot: Village of Ossining” with Richard Leins, Ossining Village Manager; Gayle Marchica, President, Greater Ossining Chamber of Commerce; Martin Ginsburg, Principal of Ginsburg Development Companies; and Todd Nicotra, Development Director, AvalonBay Communities, Inc.
  •     “Downtown Redevelopment Strategies and Opportunities” with Sadie McKeown, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of CPC
  •     “Alternative Strategies for Main Street Revitalization” with Jonathan Drapkin, President and CEO of Hudson Valley Pattern for Progress, and Joe Czajka, the organization’s Vice President of Research and Grants Administration and Executive Director of the Center for Housing Solutions
  •     “Retail Attraction, Retention and Best Practices” with Larisa Ortiz of Larisa Ortiz Associates LLC, a consulting firm specializing in commercial revitalization projects in challenging retail environments
  •     “Tourism as a Local Economic Driver” with Jerry Faiella, Executive Director of Historic Hudson River Towns, and Mary Kay Vrba, Executive Director of Dutchess County Tourism
For more information on economic development opportunities in Ossining or to schedule a walking tour of the historic Village, contact Ingrid Richards, Manager of Downtown and Economic Development, at 914-941-3554 or irichards(at)villageofossining(dot)org. The Office of Downtown and Economic Development’s website, http://www.villageofossining.org/economicdevelopment, provides businesses with financial and operational resources and includes a database of vacant commercial properties.

About the Village of Ossining:

On April 2, 1813, the Village of Ossining became the first incorporated village in Westchester County to be state-chartered. Today, Ossining is a culturally diverse, affordable place to live, rich in both history and natural beauty. Approximately 25,600 people reside in the three and one half square miles of this historic Village on the Hudson River, which boasts extensive shopping, recreational programs, educational enrichment opportunities, and excellent municipal services. Ossining’s role in New York’s heritage has been recognized by its inclusion, as one of only 14 areas, in an Urban Cultural Park System designed to attract visitors to the State. Visit http://www.villageofossining.org for more information.

About CPC:

The Community Preservation Corporation is a not-for-profit mortgage lender that finances residential multifamily development throughout New York. Since its founding in 1974, CPC has invested nearly $8.4 billion in over 157,000 units of housing. The Community Preservation’s Hudson Valley office is located at 2 Church Street, Suite 207 in Ossining, NY. For more information, please visit http://www.communityp.com.

About Historic Hudson River Towns, Inc.:

Created in 1994, Historic Hudson River Towns, Inc. (HHRT) is a consortium of municipalities located along New York’s Hudson River, from Yonkers to Albany, with a 501(c)3 not-for-profit status. HHRT is the leading inter-municipal organization helping Hudson Valley’s riverfront communities build sustainable local economies through tourism marketing, waterfront revitalization and downtown renewal. HHRT’s work is consistent with what is becoming recognized by many as the “Triple Bottom Line Dialogue,” promoting and preserving the Hudson River Valley as a region that is socially, economically and environmentally sustainable. For more information, visit http://www.hudsonriver.com.