NASA/NOAA Climatologist Says Global Water Resources Disaster Can Be Averted

Retired NOAA/NASA climatologist L. DeWayne Cecil, PhD, discusses global water politics with Bio Logic Aqua research founder Sharon Kleyne.

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Grants Pass, OR (PRWEB) April 24, 2014

If management of Earth’s water resources continues on its present path, the results could be disastrous reports retired NOAA and NASA Climatologist L. DeWayne Cecil, PhD, The terrible effects of diminishing water resources and global drought, according to Dr, Cecil, are already seen in Yemen and Somalia. California, Nevada and Arizona may not be far behind, creating a grim world of chronic, widespread water scarcity. Fortunately, Dr. Cecil also believes that there may be reasons for optimism.

Dr. Cecil made his remarks on the Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water® radio show, where he is a frequent guest. Dr. Cecil is currently employed by Global Science and Technology of Ashville, North Carolina

Sharon Kleyne, host of the globally syndicated Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water® show, is Founder of Bio Logic Aqua Research, a fresh water, atmospheric and health research and product development center. Natures Tears® EyeMist® is the Research Center’s global signature product for dry eyes. The show is broadcast on the VoiceAmerica Variety Channel, Health and Wellness Channel, and Apple iTunes.

The main causes of water shortages, Dr. Cecil believes, tend to be more political and economic than environmental. Political causes can include greedy or impoverished governments unwilling or unable to spend money on water infrastructure; unscrupulous leaders who use water as a weapon of control; and water shortages as justification to attack other countries. Poor water infrastructure is the most frequent economic cause. In the United States, water shortages may result from governments not willing to work together and from shortsightedness in planning for the future of water resources.    

Dr. Cecil and Sharon Kleyne both emphasize that without water, life on Earth could not survive. Dr. Cecil noted that the resolution of human conflict regarding water is made more difficult because chronic physical dehydration from drinking too little water can cause an increase in stress, aggression and anger. Abundant water and good nutrition has the opposite effect.

Dr. Cecil cited that Salt Lake Valley in Utah as an area struggling with water resource allocation. Projections are that by 2035, the snow pack in the adjacent Wasatch Mountains will decrease by one-third while the valley population will double. Meanwhile, according to Cecil, annual drought in the United States, which used to be confined to the arid West (California, Nevada, Arizona, Utah, New Mexico and Texas), now includes Colorado, Georgia and Alabama.

Under the George W. Bush administration, Dr. Cecil noted, an attempt was made to discover ways to counteract the global water crisis through engineering – building more dams and pipelines. Barak Obama places a greater emphasis on conservation. Under his approach, if using a beneficial resource, such as a river, is discovered to be harmful to the environment, rather than seek ways to mitigate the harm, they would simply make it illegal to use the resource.

Such an approach is of little benefit to people in Somalia, for example, which lacks basic water, food, shelter, clothing, medical care and sanitation.

The places to start in solving the global water resources problem, according to Dr. Cecil and Sharon Kleyne, are: (1) Population control. (2) The use of technology to increase the amount of available fresh water on the globe. (3) Making fresh water a basic human right available to everyone at no cost.

The reason for Dr Cecil‘s is that a few places in the world with chronic water shortages have solved their problem. The densely populated island nation of Singapore is the best example. Despite recent extend drought, Singapore has not cut back on its water allotments.

Dr. Cecil and Sharon Kleyne believe that if properly and innovatively managed, with people working together, there should be enough water for everyone. Despite the current drought in many parts of the globe, according to Cecil and Kleyne, humans on Earth n Earth have the ability and knowledge right now to avoid a global water disaster.

The question is, will the people in charge act in time or will they bicker and drag their heels until it's too late?


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