Brent Coralli Asks Sting Soccer’s Registered Dietitian Health and Nutrition Questions

What to Eat, When and Common Health Misnomers Addressed

  • Share on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInEmail a friendRepost This

Kelly Murphy, Sting Soccer's RD

Richardson, TX (PRWEB) May 30, 2014

Brent Coralli, CEO of Sting Soccer, posted the last of a three-part series of nutritional blogs - Brent Coralli Asks Sting Soccer’s Registered Dietitian Health and Nutrition Questions– today. In the blog, Kelly Murphy, a registered and licensed dietitian, continues to provide insights on the health and well-being of young athletes.

Coralli asked Murphy: about preparing for game time, common nutritional misnomers and how Kelly got involved with Sting.

Murphy’s answers include:

  •     The night before a game Sting player needs to make sure to eat carbs and fluids (in addition to vegetables and lean protein). Especially if they had practice, it is important to make sure to replace their glycogen stores (or stored energy).
  •     It is also important to consume enough fluids because dehydration can greatly affect your play. You can monitor whether or not you have had enough based on the color of your urine (aim for really pale yellow).
  •     A good meal a night before a game could be whole-wheat pasta with pasta sauce and turkey meatballs with a whole grain dinner roll and steamed broccoli.
  •     The morning of the game it is important to eat. A lot of players do not like to eat the morning before an early game but you must - if this sounds familiar, find something that works for you - - like 100 percent fruit juice or a couple pieces of toast with jelly.
  •     Half time is another time to get in fluids, carbs and electrolytes - - a cup of a sports drink or even some orange slices can help you out.
  •     After the game try to eat within 30 minutes of finishing, it doesn't have to be a huge meal but something with carbohydrates and protein like chocolate milk.
  •     In regards to protein supplements, most soccer players do not need more protein than they can consume on a daily basis; there will always be exceptions but since their intake should be primarily carbohydrates, there tend to be few who need protein supplements.
  •     Another misnomer is that carbohydrates are bad for athletes. From all of the recommendations I have given so far, I’m sure you can tell that that is not the truth. Soccer players need carbohydrates because they are a fuel. Too many calories can be detrimental to anyone’s health let alone their performance but soccer players have higher needs, therefore need more food and carbohydrates than the average person.
  •     Sting is great club. It definitely stands out from the many clubs here in Dallas. Being a Dallas transplant, I recognized Sting as having more to offer than other clubs including special programs like the ETA and special fitness and agility coaches working with the players.

For more nutritional information, read the entire blog.


Contact

Attachments