Chemist Direct finds long-term vitamin supplement use may help decrease cataract risk in men

Various studies in the last year has brought to light the damage vitamin deficiencies can cause to the eyes, including age related vision problems, particularly in men. Chemist Direct reviews the study results and defines which vitamins are essential for eye health.

  • Share on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on PinterestEmail a friend
Importance of the eyes health

Importance of the eyes health

Using regular doses of vitamin C, vitamin E, beta-carotene, zinc and copper daily may help those who have high risk of eye disorders or a family history of AMD, cataracts or binocular vision, to postpone the deterioration associated with aging.

(PRWEB UK) 14 May 2014

The structure of the eye includes millions of light-sensitive cells in the thin tissue of the retina and other nerve cells that receive and organize visual information. These unique cells are metabolically active tissues, requiring high levels of oxygen and nutrients that is supplied by daily vitamin intake. If there is a lack of sufficient oxygen these tissues begin to deteriorate and an increase in vitamins is required, particularly antioxidants, to replace the constant damage and prevent loss of vision. Continued studies on how these nutrients affect the body is needed, but enough evidence has been gathered through past observational studies to establish the need for supplement use and its relationship to eye health.

Sang Hoon Jung, a researcher at the Functional Food Centre of the Korea Institute of Science and Technology in South Korea, together with graduate student Holim Jang, studied the functional relationship of commonly consumed natural foods such as coffee and the benefits to visual health. The results showed a positive reaction to a single cup of coffee daily which helped with muscles movement and focus. http://bit.ly/1kDMHPH Further research into understanding the benefits of coffee for vision is underway, along with other food items.

In a randomized trial of data by The American Academy of Ophthalmology http://bit.ly/J4pBEf on the effects of long-term multivitamin supplement use and the risk of eye diseases, researchers based at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School -- as part of the Physicians' Health Study II (PHS II) -- conducted a randomized, double-blind study from 1997 to 2011 of 14,641 U.S. male doctors age 50 and older. Half took a common daily multivitamin, as well as vitamin C, vitamin E and beta carotene supplements. The other half took a placebo.

The researchers followed the participants to identify how many participants in each group developed new cases of two common eye diseases: cataract, which is a clouding of the eye's lens, and age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the deterioration of the eye's macula that is responsible for the ability to see fine details clearly. A modest 10 per cent of those taking multivitamins showed a reduction of cataract and AMD risk. Further on-going studies on the effect of essential vitamins on other eye disorders, including binocular vision disorders that affect as many as 27 per cent of adults in their sixties and 38 per cent for those over age 80 are in processes. That number rises to about 20 per cent of the general population suffers from a binocular vision disorder, which affects depth perception and therefore may increase the risk of falls. http://bit.ly/1g3d56R

The American Academy of Ophthalmology recommends the use of antioxidant vitamin and mineral supplements as recommended in the AREDS reports, including high daily doses of vitamin C, vitamin E, beta-carotene, zinc and copper only for patients who have intermediate or advanced AMD. http://bit.ly/1gWb0XZ Using regular doses of these vitamins daily may also help those who have high risk of eye disorders or a family history of AMD, cataracts or binocular vision, to postpone the deterioration associated with aging.


Contact

  • Maria Camanes Fores
    Chemist Direct
    +44 1215414952 Ext: 205
    Email
Follow us on: Contact's Google Plus