New Research Helps Define New Perspectives in Non-oral Drug Delivery in Parkinson’s Disease

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European Neurological Review, the peer-reviewed journal publish cutting-edge article which discusses New Perspectives in Non-oral Drug Delivery in Parkinson’s Disease.

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Oral therapies, including levodopa, dopamine agonists and monoamine oxidase type B (MAO-B) inhibitors, form the mainstay of medical treatment for Parkinson’s disease (PD).

European Neurological Review, the peer-reviewed journal publish cutting-edge article which discusses New Perspectives in Non-oral Drug Delivery in Parkinson’s Disease.

Oral therapies, including levodopa, dopamine agonists and monoamine oxidase type B (MAO-B) inhibitors, form the mainstay of medical treatment for Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, over time, chronic treatment with multiple daily doses of oral agents is often associated with the development of motor fluctuations and dyskinesias. Alternative methods of dopaminergic drug delivery, particularly if they bypass the gastrointestinal system, may be of value for PD patients who have developed motor complications despite optimised oral therapy, in particular those with gastrointestinal absorption issues, including gastroparesis. This satellite symposium, held at the XX World Congress on Parkinson’s Disease and Related Disorders, Geneva, Switzerland, from 8–11 December 2013, was chaired by Professor Werner Poewe (Austria) and Professor Andrew Lees (UK) and discussed recent evidence regarding the benefits of using non-oral drug-delivery strategies with therapies such as subcutaneous apomorphine. Beginning with the history of apomorphine and its well-established use in PD both as an intermittent injection and a continuous infusion, the presenters set out the evidence for its efficacy in managing both motor and non-motor symptoms in PD. The significance of gastrointestinal involvement in PD and how this may influence responses to oral medications was also reviewed. Interim results from the ongoing Apokyn for Motor IMProvement of Morning AKinesia Trial (AM IMPAKT) study of the use of subcutaneous apomorphine in PD patients with morning akinesia were also presented and the continuing main role of apomorphine in the treatment of PD was discussed, including the selection of the most appropriate patients for this effective yet underused therapy.

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