Moratorium to the Temporary Foreign Worker Program should not Discourage Prospective Immigrants. Other Options are Available; FWCanada Says

The moratorium on applications to the Temporary Foreign Worker program in the food services sector recently imposed by Minister of Employment and Social Development Jason Kenney constitutes one less opportunity for short-term Canadian immigration. Foreign Worker Canada recommends prospective immigrants and temporary workers currently in the country to seek legal advice in order to better navigate the changes.

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Immigration/ Canadian Law firm

FWCanada- Canadian Law Firm

In the midst of these changes, prospective immigrants and foreign workers must consider the multiple other programs that and available to them, and seek legal advice to ensure that they apply to a program that is right for them.

Montreal, Canada (PRWEB) May 23, 2014

The moratorium on applications to the Temporary Foreign Worker program in the food services sector recently imposed by Minister of Employment and Social Development Jason Kenney constitutes one less opportunity for short-term Canadian immigration. The moratorium should encourage individuals who were interested in applying to the Temporary Foreign Worker program to pursue other Canadian immigration options for temporary or permanent residency. Foreign Worker Canada recommends prospective immigrants and temporary workers currently in the country to seek legal advice in order to better navigate the changes.

The recently imposed moratorium was permitted as a result of a recent Ministerial Instruction that gave the Minister of Employment and Social Development Canada (EDSC) the power to refuse to process Labour Market Opinions in cases where relevant public policy considerations make it appropriate. Among the occupations in the food services industry that will be affected on the list provided by the EDSC are cashiers, chefs, bakers, restaurant managers, bartenders, and retail trade supervisors.

Of the moratorium, Jason Kenney stated that it would “will remain in effect until the completion of the ongoing review of the temporary foreign worker program.” During this time, foreign nationals with the intention of working in the food services industry through the Temporary Foreign Worker program will need to pursue other options for work in Canada.

“In the midst of these changes, prospective immigrants and foreign workers must consider the multiple other programs that and available to them, and seek legal advice to ensure that they apply to a program that is right for them,” recommends Marisa Feil, Supervising Attorney for FWCanada.

There are Other Options Available

A large variety of immigration programs are available to foreign nationals interested in working in Canada, which will ensure that individuals interested in the Temporary Foreign Worker food services sector will be able to seek out other opportunities for working in Canada. The Working Holiday Visa is one such example, and like the Temporary Foreign Worker Program, it allows for holders to temporarily work in Canada for a set period of time. Applicants for a Working Holiday Visa need not have a valid job offer to apply but must meet other criteria.

The food services moratorium will also provide foreign nations with the option of seeking out different immigration programs that may be less volatile that the Temporary Foreign Worker program and can lead to Canadian permanent residency. For example, the Federal Skilled Worker program is an immigration program that allows foreign workers to come to Canada without a job offer from a Canadian employer if their work experience and qualifications match an eligible occupation. The province of Quebec has a similar program, the Quebec Skilled Worker program, which also allows individuals to qualify for permanent residency in Quebec regardless of their chosen occupation.

Additionally, Canada offers the International Experience Canada (IEC) program, which has been operational since 1967 as a reciprocal immigration program that allows foreign nationals between the ages of 18 and 35 to live and work in Canada while also allowing Canadians in this same age bracket to live and work abroad. Currently, 32 countries from all corners of the world have a bilateral reciprocal youth mobility arrangement or agreement with Canada.

Participation in the International Experience Canada program will allow approximately 20,000 foreign nationals to enter Canada in 2014 to work. The majority of these workers are citizens of Ireland, as the number of Irish visas processed as part of the program rose to 10,750 this year from approximately 4,000 in 2010.

FWCanada is a Canadian Immigration Law Firm which provides expertise in immigration services such as Temporary Resident Permits, Criminal Rehabilitation, Study Permits and Work Permits. Marisa Feil and her team ensure that each case is closely evaluated to determine the most relevant program for each client. For more information, contact FWCanada at 1-855-316-3555.


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