The Journal for Social Era Knowledge - Spring 2014 - Is Published to Critical Acclaim

The spring issue of The Journal is published to critical acclaim, especially the article by Giselle Minoli and Meg Tufano entitled, “The Mythical Presence of Eros and Psyche: A Dialogue about The Bedroom, the Boardroom . . . and a Piece of Bread.”

International (PRWEB) May 29, 2014

The spring issue of The Journal for Social Era Knowledge is published to critical acclaim, especially the article by Giselle Minoli and Meg Tufano entitled, “The Mythical Presence of Eros and Psyche:  A Dialogue about The Bedroom, the Boardroom . . . and a Piece of Bread.”

John Kellden, founder of Conversation Labs (Sweden), describes Giselle and Meg’s writing as, “A Blue Book to rival Jung’s Red Book.”  He writes, “This new genre of writing is a masterpiece and a tour de force that enables women and men to rekindle their own stories and to share the embers with others, in the process rediscovering friendship and love within seeming digital wastelands.”

Other well-received features in the wide-ranging Journal format are two short science fiction stories by Laston Kirkland, each of which paints a kind of impossible to imagine –– yet somehow fully visualized –– future, completed with the kind of brevity and wit well known to Kirkland fans.  (His collected works, “Copy Me,” will be published later this year by S+.)

An international artist is spotlighted in every issue, and in this one The Journal is honored to feature Anne Curry, a member of The Royal British Society of Sculptors. Caroline Rush, who works as a researcher for the international offices of Christie’s (NYC), concludes in her personal analysis of Curry’s life and works that, “She has created a new kind of conversation - that between living plants and flowers and her renderings of them in stone.”  

David Amerland, a best-selling non-fiction author on social era subjects (“The Social Media Mind,” “Google Semantic Search,” and “Google Hangouts for Business”), suggests, in his essay, “Revolution,” that we have already become so integrated with computers that we no longer need to make the distinction “IRL.”

Because changes in education are so much a part of how the social era is affecting our lives, this important area is covered from a variety of angles in The Journal. In this issue, Derrick Wlodarz (FireLogic Technology), shares his insights about how the Internet has saved the public library.

There is also a dramatic personal tale of how a fairy tale can be anything but; and an original work by a young writer who has recreated some of Oscar Wilde’s famous tales in a way that Wilde himself would have appreciated!


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