Three Things You Should Never Hide From Your Physician

Ace Medical Group Physicians discuss how holding back facts from your doctor can actually hurt you.

  • Share on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInEmail a friendRepost This
You should be able to communicate with your doctor almost anything. And if you really can’t, may be it is time for you to find another physician who matches your personality.

Rock Hill, South Carolina (PRWEB) May 29, 2014

How to talk to a Doctor? When in the room with an intimidating personality and patient in a vulnerable position, it is easy to fumble and come out of the doctor visit without getting that feeling of satisfaction. “You should be able to communicate with your doctor almost anything. And if you really can’t, may be it is time for you to find another physician who matches your personality,” says Dr. Sandeep Grewal, a primary care physician in Rock Hill, South Carolina.

Doctors are like detectives. They piece together various cues from what patients tell them to form possible diagnoses. Then they examine the patient to narrow down the diagnoses and finally confirm the right diagnosis with tests if needed. So what patients tell them or don’t tell them is very important, according to Dr. Grewal.

Here are some tips on what not to hide from a doctor.

1.    Never hide a problem or its details. The more the doctor knows, easier his job is. Many a times patients may feel something is trivial but may be a very important clue for the trained doctor to arrive at a diagnosis. For example that rash could be a result of wearing that new shirt.

2.    Never hide a narcotics prescription you got from another physician. Doctors always looking to weed out doctor shoppers from patients who really need pain medicines. And with the advent of electronic records, they probably already know. If a patient is not upfront with his narcotic prescriptions, he or she is most likely to be considered a ‘doctor shopper’.

3.    Never Pretend Compliance. It is always safer to tell the doctor if a patient is not taking the medicine as directed. Not doing so can actually harm the patient. For example if a patient is not taking his blood pressure medicine but tells his physician otherwise will likely be prescribed even more medicine. And this can lead to unsafe drop in blood pressure this causing harm.

“Physicians are trained professionals. Nothing that they hear is embarrassing. They probably already heard everything. So be open”, says Dr. Myo Nwe physician at Ace Medical Group, a internal medicine practice in Rock Hill, South Carolina. In her practice the focus is on creating a non-intimidating environment where patients are comfortable to express and be heard.

Media Enquiries: 803 325 1111 or press(at)acemedicalgroup(dot)org.


Contact