Kwan Yin Healing and Marketing for Hippies Present "The Top 10 Blunders Holistic Practitioners Make"

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Tad Hargrave of Marketing for Hippies (http://marketingforhippies.com) and Kwan Yin Healing's Tim Emerson (http://kwanyinhealing.com) team up to present "The Top 10 Blunders Holistic Practitioners Make" at http://marketingforhippies.com/top-ten-blunders. These are fundamental and preventable mistakes nearly all holistic practitioners, life coaches, and service providers make, and are almost always entirely invisible to those making them.

Kwan Yin Healing's ( http://kwanyinhealing.com ) Four Pillars of Clarity, Connection, Coherence, and Change are applied to effective, authentic marketing at marketingforhippies.com/top-ten-blunders .

Tad Hargave, of Marketing for Hippies, teams up with Kwan Yin Healing's Tim Emerson to present "The Top 10 Blunders Holistic Practitioners Make"

The Top 10 Blunders Holistic Practitioners Make’ can be found at http://marketingforhippies.com/top-ten-blunders. For more information about Kwan Yin Healing’s Four Pillars of results, see http://kwanyinhealing.com.

“For the past six months, I had been trying to get Tad Hargrave of 'Marketing for Hippies’ to do an interview to share the ‘Six Common Fundamental Mistakes’ I had heard him share in ‘Marketing 101 for Holistic Practitioners,’” explains Tim Emerson of Kwan Yin Healing. “When we finally were able to do it this past March, though, neither of us could find the exact list of six.”

The result was a 90 minute exploratory conversation between Emerson and Hargrave, complete with examples, explanations, and connecting material from other experts. Kwan Yin Healing had it transcribed, and Marketing for Hippies turned that transcription into a 40 page booklet, “The Top 10 Blunders Holistic Practitioners Make.” More information is available at http://marketingforhippies.com/top-ten-blunders.

“To be fair, most service providers make the same blunders,” explains Hargrave. “It's honestly, I think, the same mistakes most entrepreneurs make. These are blunders that are, almost always, entirely invisible to those making them.” In particular, notes Hargrave, well-meaning people go into business to serve in some inspiring way, but then they feel the marketing is some separate piece that feels manipulative and inauthentic, and it puts the brakes on their business growth. “My central thesis in my work is that marketing can feel good,” adds Hargrave. “It’s the agenda to convert people that feels ‘icky.’”

“That feeling piece is really important,” notes Emerson. “A retail store might spend some time and thought creating the right feel for the store, geared toward their specific clientele, for example. But then the marketing goes all ‘Madison Avenue,’ because people believe they ‘have’ to do marketing via convention. How does that marketing feel, to clients? How does it feel to window-shoppers? Is it inviting? Is it inviting the right people for that business? We have to think about people’s experience of our business, from stranger to repeat client to referrals.”

An old adage in marketing says, "The confused mind says no." As Emerson explains, “When the messages don’t match, people feel the disconnect, and even if they’re genuinely curious, they’ll probably stay interested but committed window-shoppers only.”

“I see a lot of businesses like that,” adds Hargrave. “They have all these excited people lined up, going to become paying customers any day now, but it never happens. We have to be willing to be open and vulnerable ourselves, to take stands that make our platforms clear, not simply at the risk of losing some of those fence-sitters, but specifically to polarize them into ‘yes’ and ‘no’ prospects, in a manner consistent with who we are and what we do.”

“I see so many businesses,” agrees Emerson, “where I honestly don’t know what they do, even after I’ve seen their material and their website. It’s all superlatives and resumes and qualifications and certifications, but I still don’t know what problem they help with or what people they work with. And at that point, I’m not really interested in finding out. I’m just bored, or I’m off to find someone who clearly does work with what I’m seeking to accomplish.”

Kwan Yin Healing focuses on Four Pillars of results: Clarity, Connection, Coherence, and Change. “Just as people need all four of these to achieve clear results in healing, they need these four in achieving life change—or business success,” Emerson explains. “And Clarity is really the key problem—many businesses aren’t yet clear on exactly what problems they resolve and for what people exactly. Because of that, when they talk about their business, no prospective cleints come to mind for anyone.”

“Following that,” continues Emerson, “the parts of our business have to connect and function coherently together. And if these things aren’t happening, we can’t simply wait and hope, as so many people do. If we want different things, we’ll have to do things we haven’t done.” Emerson credits his comprehensive process in addressing these pillars as the reason many of his clients are entrepreneurs themselves. “It’s how we achieve measurable results.”

‘The Top 10 Blunders Holistic Practitioners Make’ can be found at http://marketingforhippies.com/top-ten-blunders. For more information about Tad Hargrave, see http://marketingforhippies.com. For more information about Tim Emerson, Kwan Yin Healing, and the Four Pillars of results, see http://kwanyinhealing.com.

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Tim Emerson
@KwanYinHealing
since: 05/2012
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