Drinking Too Little Water Increases Stress and Disease Reports Author/Therapist

Interview with Author and EFT Therapist Diana Ruiz on Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water Radio Show

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Grants Pass, OR (PRWEB) May 31, 2014

Stress is an underlying cause in an estimated 70 to 80 percent of human diseases according to Diana Ruiz, author of Healing Your Life with Water (Aviva Publishing, 2013). Stress, and therefore disease, is often the result of not drinking enough water, says Ruiz. In addition, Ruiz adds, stress can increase the rate at which the body loses water and becomes dehydrated. Ruiz made her comments during an interview of the Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water radio show.

Diana E Ruiz is a licensed EFT therapist (“Emotional Freedom Techniques”) and a frequent lecturer and entertainer. Her book was the result of many years studying what she calls the “mind, body and water connection.”

The globally syndicated Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water® radio show, with host Sharon Kleyne, is heard on the VoiceAmerica Variety and Health and Wellness Channels, and Apple iTunes. Kleyne is Founder of Bio Logic Aqua Research, a research, technology and product development center, and the world’s only company specializing in fresh water, atmosphere and health. Natures Tears® EyeMist® is the Research Center’s global signature hydration product for the eyes.

In her seven years of hosting the Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of water, says Kleyne, she has talked about the importance of drinking enough water, and the relationship between water and health, on nearly every show. The subject came up most recently on the May 22, 2014 show about dry mouth and dental health (“Dry mouth can be serious disease warning says leading dental hygienist,” PRWeb, May 23, 2014 http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/05/prweb11875918.htm).

According to Kleyne, the February 20, 2014 interview with Diana Ruiz presented an outstanding introduction to the relationship between water and health, including dental health.

To illustrate the importance and complexity of the relationship between stress, health and water, Ruiz cited an experiment that she personally conducted. Ruiz hung two plastic bags of cooked rice side by side in her kitchen. Cooked rice, like the human body and the Earth, is 70% water. On one bag she wrote “love” and on the other she wrote “hate.” Every time anyone passed the bags, they were to say “I love you” to the Love bag and “I hate you” to the Hate bag.

After one month, the rice in the Hate bag was covered with mold while the rice in the Love bag had only a small amount of mold. Ruiz based the experiment on the writing of the late Dr. Masaru Emoto (The Miracle of Water, Atria Books, 2011)

Adequate water intake, according to Ruiz, evokes feelings of love, confidence, patience and optimism, whereas too little water intake causes stress that evokes negative emotions and overrides positive emotions. A positive attitude, according to Ruiz, can increase immunity and a well hydrated body is a body at peace. A world of well hydrated bodies, says Ruiz, is a world at peace.

The minimum water intake for an adult, Kleyne and Ruiz agree, should be eight glasses a day in addition to all other fluid intake. The human body, says Kleyne, processes pure water more quickly than it does high water content foods. The water in tea, juice, spinach and watermelon may contribute to nutritional health but they would not count towards the eight glasses of water. Coffee, sugary soda and alcohol are physically dehydrating. .

Kleyne recommends drinking two of the eight glasses upon rising. For maximum absorption by the body, the water should be at room temperature or warmer, unless the drinker needs to cool down. The water should not be sipped because that slows the absorption process.

The ideal water for drinking, Ruiz believes, is slightly alkaline because the body is slightly alkaline. Ruiz also recommends an alkaline diet, emphasizing foods such as avocado, soy, beets, cabbage, celery, cucumbers and broccoli.


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