Ohio AAP Offers Water Safety Tips for Children

Summer months bring increased focus on water safety and need for parents to be vigilant in watching young children.

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Drowning happens quickly and quietly, and can occur in as little as one inch of water. When children are in or near the water, they require the undivided attention of an adult at all times.

Columbus, OH (PRWEB) June 12, 2014

June is National Safety Month, and The Ohio Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics (http://www.ohioaap.org) wants to remind parents about the importance of water safety during the summer months.

“Drowning is the second leading cause of injury death for children under five years of age and the majority of drownings in that age group occur in residential pools,” said Sarah Denny, pediatrician in the Emergency Department at Nationwide Children’s Hospital and Co-chair of the Ohio AAP Injury Prevention Committee. “Drowning happens quickly and quietly, and can occur in as little as one inch of water. When children are in or near the water, they require the undivided attention of an adult at all times.”

There have been three drownings and one near-drowning in the last two weeks in the Columbus-area alone — all children four and under. To help prevent drowning, the Ohio AAP recommends:

  •     Active adult supervision at all times. Whenever a child is in or around water, an adult should be within arm’s reach.
  •     All children have basic water safety skills. Starting children in swim lessons as soon as they are ready to learn to swim is a good way to lessen risks around a pool.
  •     Floaties, water wings and noodles are not safety devices. Do not rely on them to keep your children safe in the water.
  •     Life jackets should be worn at all times by kids and adults in and around boats.
  •     Adults learn CPR.
  •     No drug and alcohol use before or during swimming or boating activities. Alcohol use is involved in up to 70% of water recreation associated drowning deaths in adolescents and adults.
  •     Small wading pools should be emptied and turned upside down after each use.

If you are a pool owner:

  •     4-sided fencing with a self-locking gate that isolates the pool from the house has been shown to decrease drowning deaths. Above ground and inflatable pools should also have recommended fencing.
  •     Regularly check to make sure drain covers are secure and have no cracks, and replace flat drain covers with dome-shaped ones. If a pool or hot tub has a broken, loose or missing drain cover, don’t use it. Pool and spa drain covers should meet the standards outlined in the Virginia Graeme Baker Pool and Spa Safety Act. Information can be found at http://www.poolsafely.gov/pool-spa-safety-act/.
  •     Have life-saving equipment such as life rings, floats or a reaching pole available and easily accessible.

To learn more about keeping children safe in any season, visit: http://www.healthychildren.org/English/safety-prevention/Pages/default.aspx.

The Ohio Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics (Ohio AAP) promotes the health, safety and well being of children and adolescents so they may reach their full potential. The Ohio AAP works to accomplish this by addressing the needs of children, their families, and their communities, and by supporting Chapter members through advocacy, education, research, service, and improving the systems through which they deliver pediatric care.


Contact

  • Jill Buterbaugh
    Krile Communications
    +1 (614) 326-9054
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