PCI Convenes Congressional Briefing on Measuring Economic and Social Empowerment of Women

PCI brings together stakeholders to advocate for multi-dimensional measurement in foreign aid programs.

  • Share on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInEmail a friendRepost This
PCI's2014 Congressional briefing

PCI's2014 Congressional briefing

It is essential to understand the kind of impact development and corporate social responsibility programming, targeted at women and girls, truly has on the lives of women.

San Diego, CA (PRWEB) June 26, 2014

PCI (Project Concern International) convened a Congressional Briefing hosted by Congresswoman Susan Davis, Congressman Scott Peters and Congressman Juan Vargas on Friday, May 9th titled “Measuring the Hard-to-Measure: Assessing Economic and Social Empowerment of Women — the Implications on Foreign Aid.”

The event brought together a diverse group of stakeholders to discuss key challenges and actions required in order to refine and develop the tools necessary for better measurement and analysis in the field of social and behavior change at the individual and group levels. The briefing explored best practices for multi-dimensional measurement of programmatic impact across social and economic empowerment interventions.

“In 2014, women are still disproportionally affected by the interrelated causes of poverty and lack social and financial opportunities to better their lives and the lives of their children,” said Sarah Emerson, PCI’s Women Empowered Director and event moderator. “Measuring social change can be challenging because of a lack of standard definitions and differences in interpretation across cultural contexts. In order to ensure effective programming that promotes social changes linked to sustainable improvements in quality of life, it is essential to understand the kind of impact development and corporate social responsibility programming, targeted at women and girls, truly has on the lives of women.”

“We’re trying to now understand longer term kinds of outcomes and it’s harder to do,” commented Jason Wolfe, Senior Household Economic Strengthening Advisor, Office of HIV/AIDS at USAID. “It’s more complex to do, but the good thing is we now have the commitment to do it, and I think that is leading us into a better direction of measuring things that are more important to our beneficiaries and in showing the effectiveness of our work.”

Other panelists included Jeni Klugman, Director Gender and Development at The World Bank; Reid Hamel, Associate Director of Design, Monitoring, Evaluation & Research/Department of Hunger and Livelihoods at Save the Children; Nisha Singh, Senior Program Director at The SEEP Network; and Janine Schooley, Senior Vice President of Programs at PCI.

PCI has maintained a strong interest in measuring the impact of its programs over the years and has invested in systems to do so throughout more than five decades of its history. Most recently, PCI has been developing its Lives Changed Indices, specifically focused on measuring the social and economic impact of its programing on women.

To view the video, please visit http://www.pciglobal.org/2014briefing/.

###

PCI (Project Concern International) is an international health, development and humanitarian assistance organization, operating in 15 countries worldwide. Funded by federal grants and private support, PCI is dedicated to saving lives and building healthy communities around the globe, benefiting over 5.8 million people annually in Asia, Africa and the Americas. PCI’s headquarters are located in San Diego, CA and the organization also has an office in Washington, DC and a Seattle, WA representative. PCI’s current annual budget is $49 million and the organization has nearly 600 employees worldwide.


Contact