Get up to speed with dealing with junctions and roundabouts, says IAM

Road safety charity the IAM is offering tips from Britain’s top advanced driver, Peter Rodger. This week he is advising on avoiding problems at roundabouts.

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(PRWEB UK) 3 July 2014

Road safety charity the IAM is offering tips from Britain’s top advanced driver, Peter Rodger. This week he is advising on avoiding problems at roundabouts.

  • Information: Look well ahead; check your mirrors so that you know what other traffic there is around you. Give any signals in plenty of time. Try and identify a gap in the traffic before you reach the roundabout, but keep an eye on the car in front – they may not go for the gap you would
  • Position: Approach the roundabout according to which exit you’re taking. Keep to the left lane to turn left or go straight and the right lane when taking an exit on the right. Watch for any road markings guiding you and try to give other vehicles plenty of space.
  • Speed: Slow down smoothly to a speed that’s appropriate for the roundabout, taking into account the position of other road users
  • Gears: Once you’re at the right speed, and before turning, select the correct gear. Do a final mirror check, especially the mirror on the side you are turning towards
  • Accelerate: At a roundabout choose a gap in the traffic and accelerate smoothly into it – the same applies to any other junction

Rodger said: “At roundabouts, it is useful to try and consider the whole thing as one manoeuvre – that way you have a plan about which lane to be in, when to move into that lane, and what signals you expect to use. But you need to prepare to be flexible – other road users don’t always behave as we’d expect them to.”

ENDS

Notes to editors:

1. Follow us on Twitter @IAMgroup.
2. Peter Rodger is the IAM’s chief examiner
3. The IAM is the UK’s largest independent road safety charity, dedicated to improving standards and safety in driving, motorcycling and cycling. The commercial division of the IAM operates through its occupational driver training company IAM Drive & Survive. The IAM has more than 200 local volunteer groups and over 100,000 members in the UK and Ireland. It is best known for the advanced driving test and the advanced driving, motorcycling and cycling courses. Its policy and research division offers advice and expertise on road safety.

ENDS ALL

Media contacts:
IAM Press Office – 020 8996 9777
press.office(at)iam(dot)org.uk
ISDN broadcast lines available
iam.org.uk


Contact

  • Tanvir Nandra
    Institute of Advanced Motorists
    +44 2089969777
    Email