U.S. Farms Toxic Says Health Food Pioneer on Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water

Patricia Bragg, of Bragg Live Foods Explains Benefits of Organic and Natural Foods to Bio Logic Aqua Research Founder Sharon Kleyne

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Grants Pass, OR (PRWEB) July 23, 2014

“I believe that 70% of farms in the United States are toxic," says Patricia Bragg, longtime spokesperson for Bragg Live Foods, whose products are sold in nearly all health food stores worldwide. Bragg expressed this opinion on the Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water radio show of July 21, 2014. The heath food advocate attributed the toxicity to big business farming, consumer demand and a “quick-fix mentality.”

Patricia Bragg is a spokesperson for Bragg Live Foods and daughter-in-law of Paul Bragg, who founded the now global company in 1912. Bragg is a prolific writer, speaker, world traveler and “nutritionist to the stars,” including Clint Eastwood. She is author of Water: the Shocking Truth (Bragg Health Sciences, 2004).

The globally syndicated Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water® radio show, with host Sharon Kleyne, is heard on VoiceAmerica and Apple iTunes. Kleyne is also Founder of Bio Logic Aqua Research, a research, technology and product development center and the only company in the world specializing in fresh water, atmosphere and health. Natures Tears® EyeMist®, a 100% pure water mist, is the Research Center’s global signature product for dry eyes.

The farmland toxicity to which Bragg refers consists of pesticide residue, chemical fertilizer residue, GMO contamination, etc. In addition, Kleyne adds, the long-term effects on soils, crops and nutrient content, of practices such as irrigation, ground water mining, hybridization and annual plowing are not yet fully understood. Bragg’s company operates a large organic farm that does not rely on these practices.

Large corporate farms, Bragg explained, engage in toxic farming practices because of their emphasis on crops that are fast growing, large in size, uniform, and free from pest damage, with maximum yield per acre. Kleyne observed that these practices are generally in response to consumer demand. Consumers want products to look good and to be readily and abundantly available at all times at affordable prices.

If taste can be enhanced to emphasize sugar, salt or fat; and shelf life can be extended through processing and alteration, says Kleyne, the food becomes even more desirable. The result is potato chips rather than potatoes, peanut candy rather than peanuts and chocolate milk rather than milk. The list is endless.

Kleyne believes that sugar, salt and fat – especially sugar – are extremely harmful when consumed in excess, and also highly addictive.    

Kleyne calls the desire to have all needs met immediately through the use of technology, the “quick fix mentality.” According to Kleyne, the quick fix mentality is even more predominant in the pharmaceutical industry than the food industry.

Bragg and Kleyne urge consumers to let food store managers know that they prefer foods that are GMO-free, pesticide-free and organically grown under natural conditions. Either talk to the store manager or simply do not purchase products that fail to meet these standards. This kind of consumer input creates demand and is the reason most supermarket chains now carry organic produce and health foods.

Bragg is uncomfortable with confrontational protests and demonstrations because she believes it makes the protest the story rather than the cause being the story.

Bragg and Kleyne agree that the most important food of all is water, which ideally will be drawn from a natural source and not stored in plastic bottles. Kleyne recommends at least eight glasses per day in addition to all other fluids.


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