A New Book “Tigers Forever: Saving the World's Most Endangered Big Cat” is Helping to Highlight Endangered Tiger Issues on Global Tiger Day

A new book “Tigers Forever: Saving the World's Most Endangered Big Cat” is helping to bring to light the issues endangered tigers face on Global Tiger Day, July 29, 2014, according to journalist and co-author Sharon Guynup.

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Tiger in The Wild - photo by Steve Winter/National Geographic

If we're going to save tigers--one of the planet's most iconic animals--people need to understand the threats they face and what's being done to mitigate those threats, both what’s working on the ground–-and what isn’t." Sharon Guynup.

Phoenix, AZ (PRWEB) July 29, 2014

A new book “Tigers Forever: Saving the World's Most Endangered Big Cat” is helping to bring to light the issues endangered tigers face on Global Tiger Day, July 29, 2014, according to journalist and co-author Sharon Guynup.

The book, a collaboration between Guynup and award-winning National Geographic photographer Steve Winter, melds spectacular images of tigers and their secret behaviors with insights into why one of the world’s most iconic species is careening towards the edge--and describes the extraordinary efforts to save them.

The book is published by National Geographic Books.

Guynup, who is both a journalist and photographer, writes on wildlife conservation and environmental issues--but she has written extensively on big cats and other endangered species.

She says the goal of the book is to help save tigers in the wild; something both she and Winter are passionate about.

“In 2007, I was working on a story about rhino poaching in Kaziranga–when I glimpsed my first wild tiger and began writing regularly about big cats,” says Guynup. “In 2007, global estimates of remaining wild tigers hovered around 3,500; by the time Steve’s Nat Geo story “Cry of the Tiger” ran in National Geographic in 2011, estimates had dropped to about 3,200.”

She said this caused her to ponder what a world without wild tigers would actually be like.

“The idea of a world without tigers is sad beyond words,” says Guynup. "Steve and I were driven to speak louder, hoping to help jar the world into action before it’s too late. So together we produced Tigers Forever."

The book includes over 100 of Steve's images--but it also tells the tiger's story. To do that, Guynup interviewed over 60 of the world's top tiger experts to learn why these cats have been both feared and revered throughout human history--and to explore why they're disappearing.

"If we're going to save tigers--one of the planet's most iconic animals--people need to understand the threats they face and what's being done to mitigate those threats, both what’s working on the ground–-and what isn’t,” she says.

The book also profiles "tiger heroes," the men and women across tiger range who study the cats, fight poachers, protect tiger reserves, investigate the black market trade in tigers and more.

The good news, Guynup says, is that there is still enough habitat to support healthy tiger populations. "One thing I’ve learned is that they’re very adaptable. Tigers thrive with just the basics: food, water and a place to live. When you add boots-on-the-ground protection, strong laws, enforcement and careful monitoring, they bounce back."

Guynup notes that if we want to save these majestic creatures, we need to get involved, “In the words of renowned field biologist George Schaller, “I learned long ago that conservation has no victories. It’s a never-ending process that each of us must take part in.”

“So, if we want to have tigers in the world," says Guynup, "we must speak up and speak loudly."

Go here to purchase Tigers Forever: Saving the World’s Most Endangered Big Cat.

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Endangered Species Journalist Craig Kasnoff writes about the plight of endangered species and the efforts to save them.


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