Marconi Society Selects 2014 Paul Baran Young Scholars

Kiseok Song and Himanshu Asnani have been named the 2014 Marconi Society Paul Baran Young Scholars, recognizing their outstanding achievements in the field of information science and the Internet.

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In selecting its Young Scholar recipients, the Marconi Society looks for those who not only have shown extraordinary early promise, but whose research already has been published and made an impact

Mountain View, CA (PRWEB) September 04, 2014

Korean researcher Kiseok Song and Himanshu Asnani, a Stanford Ph.D candidate and system engineer at Ericsson Silicon Valley, have been named as the 2014 Marconi Society Paul Baran Young Scholars, recognizing their outstanding work in the field of communications and the Internet. The prizes will be presented at the Marconi Society’s annual gala in Washington, D.C., October 2nd, where the Society also will present the 2014 Marconi Prize to MIMO inventor Arogyaswami Paulraj, Professor Emeritus at Stanford.

Song, a 26-year-old Ph.D candidate at Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology(KAIST), has developed bio-medical SoCs that already are making an impact in the bio-medical field, according to KAIST Professor Hoi-Jun Yoo, Song’s primary advisor. His achievements include the invention of smart wireless bio-medical systems combined with optimized “System on a Chip” (SoC); compact bio-medical patch systems connected to smart phones; smart electro-acupuncture and transdermal drug delivery; and multi-modal non-invasive glucose monitors, among others.

“All of these bio-medical systems open a new healthcare paradigm to improve people’s quality of life in combination with the current mobile smart phones,” says Professor Yoo. “The challenge was to take into account wide design considerations, such as high performance, convenience, and safety for bio-medical system design, from transistor (bottom) level to system (top) level, covering biological background, circuit technique, system and application design.”

Asnani was honored for his achievements in point-to-point and multi-terminal channel coding and source coding problems. Professor Tsachy Weissman, his primary advisor at Stanford, said Asnani’s work made “profound contributions to our understanding of the fundamental limits in new communication and data compression scenarios (both point-to-point and multi-terminal), the structure of the schemes that achieve these limits, their implementations, and their performance in practice.”

Asnani’s work also has involved Human Genome Compression, where vast amounts of genomic sequencing data being generated by Next Generation Sequencing technology may occupy tens or even hundreds of gigabytes of disk space. He and his collaborators found a new way to compress quality scores, resulting in significantly reduced storage requirements and fast analysis and transmission of sequencing data. A number of companies are interested in applying the findings.

Asnani earned an All India Rank (AIR) -4 in the IIT JEE Examination, and received a Bachelor of Technology in 2009 at the Electrical Engineering School at IIT, Mumbai. He earned his M.S. at Stanford’s Electrical Engineering School in 2011, and then began his Ph.D studies. Concurrently, he works as a System Engineer at Ericsson Silicon Valley, R&D department, where he interned in the summer of 2008. His assignments include a number of emerging areas, including designing Next Generation Communication and Computer Networks. He also has been leading Ericsson's collaborations with many startup partners and vendors to port new features and applications in an SDN-NFV based cloud platform.

“In selecting its Young Scholar recipients, the Marconi Society looks for those who not only have shown extraordinary early promise, but whose research already has been published and made an impact,” says Robert Tkach, Chairman of the Young Scholar selection committee and a 2009 Marconi Prize Winner. "Kiseok and Himanshu meet this standard admirably.”

This is the seventh year that Young Scholars Awards have been granted by the Marconi Society, which is best known for its annual $100,000 Marconi Award and Fellowship given to living scientists whose scope of work and influence emulate the principle of “creativity in service to humanity."

The Young Scholar Awards winners are selected from nominations submitted by faculty members, department chairs, or managers with whom they have worked closely. The awards include a financial stipend and an invitation and travel funds to attend the annual Marconi Award Dinner, to be held this year in Washington D.C. on October 2nd. For more information, please visit http://www.Marconisociety.org.


Contact

  • Hatti Hamlin
    Marconi Society
    +1 9258724328
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