September Brings National Safety Preparedness Month; Mr. Electric® has tips to safely operate generators

Mr. Electric has tips to keep homeowners safe and better prepared to use generators for when disaster strikes or the need arises.

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WACO, Texas (PRWEB) September 03, 2014

September is National Safety Preparedness Month, and Mr. Electric wants homeowners to be able to safely use generators when power outages occur. Generators are helpful when temporary power is necessary, but there are hazards that come with using electric generators. Mr. Electric has tips to keep homeowners safe and better prepared to use generators for when disaster strikes or the need arises.

Mr. Electric wants to remind homeowners that permanently placed standby electric generators should be installed by a licensed electrician.

  • Shock and electrocution
Never directly connect a generator to the electrical system of a home or office.
Attaching it directly to the home without a proper transfer switch installed by a qualified, licensed electrician can cause the wire to be energized for a long distance. This could put workers and others in the area at risk of electrocution.

  • Protect the generator from the elements
Keep the generator dry.
If necessary, protect the generator with a canopy. Never use the generator in wet or rainy weather or manipulate the electrical components if you are in standing water. Correctly storing and maintaining generators will prolong the life of the unit.

  • Carbon monoxide (CO2) poisoning
Never use a generator indoors.
Carbon monoxide is a toxic gas that is colorless and odorless, and it can pose a threat when allowed to build up in an enclosed space. Opening windows and doors may not prevent carbon monoxide from building up and is not adequate ventilation. Generators should only be operated outside and at a safe distance from housing structures.

  • Fire Hazards
Before refueling, shut down the generator and allow it to cool.
Generators get hot while running and will remain hot for a period after being shut down. Generator fuels can ignite after coming in contact with hot generator parts. Allow the generator to shut and cool down before adding fuel.

Being aware of the inherent hazards of electric generators will help prevent harmful situations. These tips from Mr. Electric will keep homeowners safe while operating permanently placed and portable generators.


Contact

  • Jason Lee
    The Dwyer Group 1
    +1 (254) 745-5085
    Email