The Crisis of 1914 and What it Means for Us Today: Carnegie Council Presents Multimedia Materials from Sarajevo

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To commemorate the June 1914 assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand that led to World World I, and discuss what it means for us now, one hundred years to the day, Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs held a high-profile symposium in Sarajevo.

Sarajevo bridge where Franz Ferdinand was killed, 1914.

Sarajevo bridge where Franz Ferdinand was killed, 1914.

We come here—100 years to the day from the calamitous events of the summer of 1914—to remember, to take stock, and to recommit to the ideals passed on to us by Andrew Carnegie and others.

On June 28, 1914, Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife were assassinated in Sarajevo, a calamity that led to the outbreak of World War I.

To commemorate this event and discuss what it means for us today, on June 27-28, 2014,Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs held a high-profile symposium in Sarajevo. The Council's history is closely linked to World War I. Andrew Carnegie founded the organization in February 1914, with the goal of putting an end to war. The symposium was part of the Council's Centennial activities.

In order of appearance, the speakers were: Joel Rosenthal, Margaret MacMillan, George Rupp, David Rodin, Adam Roberts, Ivo Banac, Mustafa Cerić (panel moderator), and Michael Ignatieff.

Carnegie Council is proud to present the audios, videos, and transcripts from this historic symposium. To access them, go to http://www.carnegiecouncil.org/programs/sarajevo/index.html

World War to a Global Ethic
Joel H. Rosenthal, President, Carnegie Council
"We come here—100 years to the day from the calamitous events of the summer of 1914—to remember, to take stock, and to recommit to the ideals passed on to us by Andrew Carnegie and others. The Carnegie ideal was simple but audacious: it is indeed realistic and possible to use reason and experience to improve the ways in which we live."

Was World War I Inevitable?
Margaret MacMillan, Oxford University
We're still trying to understand what World War I meant. It is a very complex event, one that has echoes into the present, and we've all been thinking recently about parallels between that world and our own world. One of the very important things is not to start by assuming that it was inevitable.

Religion in War and Reconciliation
George Rupp, Carnegie Council
"There is a long way to go before religious communities become more of a resource for reducing rather than a source for increasing antagonism. But to move in that direction clearly requires greater understanding at the local level."

Ethics and War
David Rodin, Oxford University
"In this talk I want to consider how the ways in which we assess the morality of war are changing. My concern is not to judge the morality or otherwise of any particular war, but rather to say something about the enterprise of thinking morally about war, an exercise bound tightly to our deepest political and moral identity."

Legal and Moral International Norms Since 1914
Adam Roberts, Oxford University
"What lessons has humankind learned from the events of 1914 in Sarajevo? And are there further lessons that we should have learned, but didn't? Have our legal and moral norms changed (hopefully for the better) in the years since?"

War and Reconciliation in the Twentieth-Century Balkans
Ivo Banac, Yale University
What are the remedies for the endless cycles of violence in the Balkans? Croatian historian Ivo Banac examines various solutions that have been tried and found wanting, to some extent, and concludes with another possibility.

Sarajevo Panel Discussion
In this wide-ranging conversation, participants from the Sarajevo Symposium discuss the past, present, and future of the former Yugoslav states with a focus on Bosnia and Herzegovina. How can private citizens and governments work together to build a more pluralistic society?

Sarajevo Symposium, Closing Remarks
Michael Ignatieff, Carnegie Council Centennial Chair
"We have all got to live with each other. There will be Serbs here in a thousand years, Croats here in a thousand years. We're stuck with each other. We don't have to love each other. This is not a council of brotherhood and unity. We did that. It didn't go so well. It's just a council of deep individual responsibility for ourselves as historical agents in time."

Founded by Andrew Carnegie in 1914, Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs is an educational, nonprofit, nonpartisan organization that produces lectures, publications, and multimedia materials on the ethical challenges of living in a globalized world. For more information go to http://www.carnegiecouncil.org

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Madeleine Lynn