All About Learning Press, Inc. Explores Ways to Help Children with Dysgraphia

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We’re all familiar with dyslexia, but a new blog post from the publishers of All About Reading and All About Spelling raises awareness about another learning disability.

All About Reading, All About Spelling, Marie Rippel, homeschool, dysgraphia
A child with dysgraphia often has a much easier time expressing ideas verbally than in writing.

In an effort to help children with dysgraphia achieve success in reading and spelling, All About Learning Press, Inc. has released a new blog post that explores ways to overcome the inherent difficulties faced by dysgraphics.

In her recent post, Dysgraphia: How can I help my child?, Marie Rippel, author of the All About Reading and All About Spelling programs and curriculum developer at All About Learning Press, Inc., explains the symptoms of this neurologically-based learning disability, including reluctance to write, difficulty forming letters, numbers, and words, and trouble with spelling. “Dysgraphia makes the process of writing difficult,” says Rippel. “A child with dysgraphia often has a much easier time expressing ideas verbally than in writing.”

According to Rippel, for a child with dysgraphia, the very act of writing takes so much energy that it actually interferes with the process of learning. “That can negatively impact his ability to learn,” she adds. In her blog post, Rippel explores nine different ways to help children with dysgraphia to overcome their difficulty with writing, including a focus on keyboarding skills and the use of multisensory methods to practice correct letter formation.

All About Learning Press, Inc., publisher of the award-winning All About Reading and All About Spelling programs, has made it their mission to help parents teach their children to read and spell successfully so every child can reach his or her full potential. The programs are based on the Orton-Gillingham instructional approach, and were created by author and curriculum developer Marie Rippel. The programs teach children the way they learn naturally—through sight, sound, and touch—and students use letter tiles, flashcards, fluency practice, comprehension exercises, activities, and 100 percent decodable readers. The lightly scripted "open and go" lesson plans do not require any previous teaching experience. The program also comes with lifetime support and a 100 percent money-back guarantee.

For more information about dysgraphia or the All About Reading and All About Spelling programs, visit http://www.allaboutlearningpress.com.

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Contact: Greg Rippel
(715) 477-1976

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