Emergency Veterinary Services in the US Industry Market Research Report from IBISWorld Has Been Updated

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The advent of new medical technologies for the human healthcare sector has shaped emergency veterinary practices' product portfolio; for example, many emergency veterinarians now provide blood typing, blood transfusions, cross-matching and oxygen therapy as well as diagnostic testing services. For these reasons, industry research firm IBISWorld has updated a report on the Emergency Veterinary Services industry in its growing industry report collection.

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An expansion in product and service offerings will help industry operators boost their margins

During the past five years, the Emergency Veterinary Services industry has exhibited slight growth, driven by a rise in the average veterinary expenditure. According to the American Pet Products Association's (APPA) 2014 National Pet Owners Survey, 68.0% of US households owned a pet, which equates to 82.5 million homes. According to data from the APPA, total pet expenditures have risen at an average annual rate of 5.2% during the five years to 2014, which can be partly attributed to robust demand for high-cost industry services. IBISWorld Economic Analyst Sarah Turk says in the updated report, “overall, emergency veterinary practices provide high-cost treatments, such as time-sensitive surgical procedures (e.g. liver shunt correction, fracture repairs, removal of cancerous masses and organ biopsies).”

Additionally, the advent of new medical technologies for the human healthcare sector has also shaped emergency veterinary practices' product portfolio. For example, many emergency veterinarians provide blood typing, blood transfusions, cross-matching and oxygen therapy as well as diagnostic testing services (e.g. electrocardiograms). During the five years to 2014, industry revenue is anticipated to grow marginally. Profit is expected to rise from 2009 to 2014, thanks to more pet owners having pet insurance, thus stimulating demand for high-value procedures in line with lower out-of-pocket costs.

During the five years to 2019, industry revenue is also forecast to grow. Many emergency veterinary practices will include more on-site critical care specialists and other specialized employees (e.g. surgeons), thus bolstering industry revenue by providing more high-value treatments. “Furthermore, the Veterinary Medicine Mobility Act in 2014 will enable emergency veterinarians to administer care to animals outside of their practice and across state lines, providing a boon to the industry,” Turk says in the updated report. Thanks to the advent of new pet medications, the pet population is likely to rapidly age over the five-year period, which will spur demand for emergency veterinary care.

For more information, visit IBISWorld’s Emergency Veterinary Services in the US industry report page.

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IBISWorld industry Report Key Topics

Companies in this industry provide emergency veterinary services to livestock, equines and domesticated animals.

Industry Performance
Executive Summary
Key External Drivers
Current Performance
Industry Outlook
Industry Life Cycle
Products & Markets
Supply Chain
Products & Services
Major Markets
Globalization & Trade
Business Locations
Competitive Landscape
Market Share Concentration
Key Success Factors
Cost Structure Benchmarks
Barriers to Entry
Major Companies
Operating Conditions
Capital Intensity
Key Statistics
Industry Data
Annual Change
Key Ratios

About IBISWorld Inc.
Recognized as the nation’s most trusted independent source of industry and market research, IBISWorld offers a comprehensive database of unique information and analysis on every US industry. With an extensive online portfolio, valued for its depth and scope, the company equips clients with the insight necessary to make better business decisions. Headquartered in Los Angeles, IBISWorld serves a range of business, professional service and government organizations through more than 10 locations worldwide. For more information, visit http://www.ibisworld.com or call 1-800-330-3772.

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Gavin Smith
IBISWorld
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