Copper Ridge Institute's Improved Dementia Risk Assessment Available Online

Share Article

Researchers at the Copper Ridge Institute, an education and research organization devoted to Alzheimer’s disease and related conditions, announce the launch of version 2.0 of their highly successful Dementia Risk Assessment. This online questionnaire provides personally-tailored information about one’s risk of developing late-life cognitive impairment.

There is no cure for Alzheimer’s disease. But some of the other risk factors – such as hypertension and diabetes -- are modifiable. If people change their health habits in mid-life, they may be able to tilt the odds in their favor.

Researchers at the Copper Ridge Institute, an education and research organization devoted to Alzheimer’s disease and related conditions, announce the launch of version 2.0 of their highly successful Dementia Risk Assessment.

This online questionnaire provides personally-tailored information about one’s risk of developing late-life cognitive impairment. There is a self-report version and a rater-report version; the latter enables a survey-taker to enter information about a loved one (parent, grandparent) and discover his/her risk of developing one of these conditions. Each version takes only about 10 minutes to complete and can be accessed for free at http://www.alzcast.org/memorysurvey.

“Version 1.0 of our Dementia Risk Assessment was highly successful,” says its developer, Jason Brandt, Ph.D. “We provided vital information on the risk of late-life cognitive impairment to approximately 9,000 people worldwide. But version 2.0 contains many improvements and refinements, and we anticipate that people who take the new survey will find the feedback it provides even more valuable.”

“There is no cure for Alzheimer’s disease,” says Brandt, Director of the Copper Ridge Institute and Professor of Psychiatry and Neurology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, “and the two most powerful risk factors – family history and aging – are things we can’t do anything about. But some of the other risk factors – such as hypertension and diabetes -- are modifiable. If people change their health habits in mid-life, they may be able to tilt the odds in their favor.”

The Copper Ridge Institute is a not-for-profit organization and is affiliated with the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Share article on socal media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Jason Brandt, PhD

Sara Thompson
Visit website