Surviving Mesothelioma Warns of Potential Mesothelioma Risk from Cement Water Pipes

Share Article

Mesothelioma education website cites statistics on thousands of older water pipes in the U.S. that may still contain mesothelioma-causing asbestos.

Aging Water Pipes Could Pose Health Risk

Aging Water Pipes Can Release Asbestos

Because asbestos is so closely linked to malignant mesothelioma, we believe that it is important for the public...to be aware of potential asbestos sources...

Surviving Mesothelioma says thousands of water pipes in the U.S. contain asbestos and EPA information indicates that these pipes can leach asbestos into drinking water as they age. Click here to go to the full story on the Surviving Mesothelioma website.

According to the EPA, in addition to the erosion of natural asbestos deposits, decaying water mains made of asbestos cement are the major source of asbestos in drinking water.

To protect consumers from mesothelioma, water providers are subject to routine monitoring to ensure that asbestos levels stay in the safe range, but if they rise, facilities have up to 30 days to let consumers know.

“Because asbestos is so closely linked to malignant mesothelioma, we believe that it is important for the public, including workers called to work on these water mains, to be aware of the potential for asbestos contamination and to know their rights to protect themselves,” says Alex Strauss, Managing Editor of Surviving Mesothelioma.

The Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization estimates that millions of miles of pipes made of asbestos cement were in installed in the U.S. between the 1960s and the 1980s. According to Exponent, an engineering and scientific consulting firm, these pipes have a lifespan of about 70 years.

To learn more about EPA guidelines for asbestos in drinking water, including where you can go for information about the safety of your own water supply, see Mesothelioma Risk from Aging Asbestos Water Pipes, now available on the Surviving Mesothelioma website.

Sources:
Basic Information About Asbestos in Drinking Water, EPA website,
“Aged asbestos-cement water pipes across U.S. pose a risk for workers”, Nov. 13, 2012, Water World, http://www.waterworld.com/articles/2012/11/aged-asbestos-cement-water-pipes-pose-a-risk-for-us-workers.html

For nearly ten years, Surviving Mesothelioma has brought readers the most important and ground-breaking news on the causes, diagnosis and treatment of mesothelioma. All Surviving Mesothelioma news is gathered and reported directly from the peer-reviewed medical literature. Written for patients and their loved ones, Surviving Mesothelioma news helps families make more informed decisions.

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Michael Ellis
Cancer Monthy
+1 (919) 570-8595
Email >
Follow us on
Visit website