2015 NLN Leadership Conference February 5-7 San Antonio

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At the “Academic Leadership Excellence: Co-Creating a Collaborative Culture” in San Antonio, February 5-7, 2015, experts will address dynamics that often stand in the way of successful organizational performance: resistance, power, authority, and competition.

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“The conference promises to explore innovations to co-create strategic environments that build collaboration among faculty, administrators, and students.” NLN CEO Dr. Beverly Malone

At the annual National League for Nursing Leadership Conference, next month in San Antonio, esteemed experts and thought leaders will share strategies to address dynamics that often stand in the way of successful organizational performance: resistance, power, authority, and competition.

This premier faculty development opportunity is made possible through the NLN’s Center for Transformational Leadership, whose mission is to assist nurse educators to advance to leadership roles and to integrate leadership theory across the curriculum, fostering the development of leaders in both educational and practice settings.

Remarked Marsha Howell Adams, PhD, RN, CNE, FAAN, ANEF, president of the NLN and dean of the College of Nursing at the University of Alabama-Huntsville: “It’s no secret that how people work, think, and behave in any enterprise depends in large measure on the organizational culture. That’s why co-creating a positive culture where diverse opinions, perspectives, and ideas are respected is an essential task for effective leadership, not least in an academic environment, where nurse educators set the tone for student learning.”

“The 2015 Leadership Conference promises to explore innovations to co-create strategic environments that build collaboration among faculty, administrators, and students,” noted NLN CEO Beverly Malone, PhD, RN, FAAN. “Probing presentations by our four outstanding plenary speakers will be followed by small group discussions that invite a proactive ‘call to action’ approach to change. An interactive courageous dialogue at the conference’s conclusion is designed to engage participants in critical experiential learning.”

At a Welcome Reception on Thursday evening, February 5, Barbara Nichols, DHL, MSN, RN, FAAN, who for 12 years, until her retirement in 2011, led CGFNS International, a nonprofit organization globally recognized as an authority on credentials evaluation of the education, registration, and licensure of nurses, will open the conversation about how leadership can transform organizational culture. The following day, Dr. Adams will welcome everyone before introducing the morning’s first plenary speakers, both from Cone Health System: Timothy Rice, MHA, CEO emeritus, and Joan Evans, MBA, vice president for innovation and transformation. Their theme, “Co-Creating a Positive Organizational Culture,” will describe how their successful model resulted in positive change in collaboration, patient outcomes, and productivity and which, they contend, can be easily replicated within schools of nursing.

Next, Susan Groenwald, PhD, RN, FAAN, ANEF, president of Chamberlain College of Nursing, will present “Transforming Educational Culture through a Model of Care,” one institution’s initiative to contradict the prevalence of incivility, bullying, and lateral violence widely documented in educational and practice settings.

The final plenary session, “Rankism and Its Impact on Diverse and Inclusive Cultures,” will be facilitated by Michael Bleich, PhD, RN, FNAP, FAAN, the Maxine Clark and Bob Fox Dean, professor, and president of Barnes-Jewish College and Goldfarb School of Nursing at Washington University in St. Louis. Dr. Bleich will guide participants in an interactive discussion of rankism as a tactic for the distribution of power, along with its positive and negative uses.

For complete information on the 2015 NLN Leadership Conference, including bio sketches of plenary speakers and online registration, visit the conference website.

Dedicated to excellence in nursing, the National League for Nursing is the premier organization for nurse faculty and leaders in nursing education. The NLN offers faculty development, networking opportunities, testing services, nursing research grants, and public policy initiatives to its more than 40,000 individual and more than 1,200 institutional members, comprising nursing education programs across the spectrum of higher education and health care organizations.

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