Jason Hope, ABC Encourage Consumers to Prevent Hacking of Internet of Things Devices

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With millions of new Internet of Things devices coming online this Christmas season, ABC and Jason Hope have recommendations for consumers about preventing hacking of these devices. With these tips, consumers can protect their devices and data as the Internet of Things grows.

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Often devices are hacked because the latest fixes are not installed. Also, fixing the main device first will help protect the most crucial data and entry points for the average home, even if peripheral devices are not secure

As thousands of households add smartphones, tablets and other "smart" devices this past Christmas season, ABC warns consumers that around 70 percent of these devices contain major vulnerabilities that can be hacked. Jason Hope and ABC want to give these consumers help with locking down their devices as they prepare for the rise of the Internet of Things.

In the ABC News article, entitled "Internet of Things: How to Keep Your Connected Devices Safe from Hackers," which was written by Alyssa Newcomb and published on December 17, 2014, experts from around the tech world were quoted about the topic of Internet of Things security. Robert Siciliano of McAfee recommended specific steps people could take to make their connected devices are secure. Among these recommendations are:

  • Securing the main connected devices first.
  • Installing anti-virus and anti-phising software
  • Using spyware sweeping software
  • Never use default password or username for a device
  • Registering the device with the manufacturer
  • Adding patches and updates when needed

"This is crucial advice," said Jason Hope, entrepreneur and futurist. "Often devices are hacked because the latest fixes are not installed. Also, fixing the main device first will help protect the most crucial data and entry points for the average home, even if peripheral devices are not secure."

Siliciano recommends fully securing the main device before installing any peripherals, then running an anti-virus scan when any new device is installed "These devices could all be infected already out of the box," he warns.

"With 26 billion connected devices expected by 2020," Jason Hope continued, "this security advice is crucial. Without security, people put their homes, families and most personal information at risk. The good news is security is not difficult. It simply requires a bit of basic education."

About Jason Hope

Jason Hope is an entrepreneur and futurist who lives in Scottsdale. The Arizona native uses his resources to future education and research into technology and health products that will fight aging and improve life for the average person. Learn more about his most recent projects at http://www.jasonhope.com.

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