World War I: Willy-Nicky Were Willy-Nilly Emperors ~ New WCHU on the Bryan William Brickner Blog

World War I Emperors and Hannah Arendt are noted this July Crisis centennial in the fourth posting of the summer War Cry Heal Union series from Ew Publishing. Author Bryan W. Brickner draws attention to the anti-Semitism of that age and its deadly effects on the unrepresented of Europe.

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War Cry Heal Union

When asked about 1933 Germany, the year the Nazis came into power, Arendt’s response echoes the Unrepresented of any age. Indifference, she said, was no longer possible in 1933. It was impossible even before that.

Chicago, IL (PRWEB) July 19, 2014

Marking the centennial of the July Crisis of 1914 and the beginning of World War I, the Ew Publishing summer series War Cry Heal Union (WCHU) notes Hannah Arendt in contrast to the Emperors (and cousins) Kaiser Wilhelm and Tsar Nicholas; the essay draws attention to the anti-Semitism of that age and its deadly effects on the unrepresented of Europe.

Hosted on the Bryan William Brickner Blog, the fourth installment of the WCHU series, World War I: Willy-Nicky Were Willy-Nilly Emperors, depicts the hubristic nature of empire; from 28 July to 1 August 1914, the two Emperors exchanged telegrams with the intention of avoiding “bloodshed” ~ the Willy-Nicky Telegrams.

“The telegrams are ego-empiric,” noted Brickner, “as it is 1914 and Freud is nearby (in Vienna, Austria) practicing his new art, psychoanalysis. The telegrams read nice at the beginning, with both Emperors talking peace and accommodation; at the end though, hours prior to the catastrophe commencing, the letters expose the inherent insecurity and paranoia of empire.”

“With Hannah Arendt,” Brickner continued, “we have a person who lived through the mayhem caused by willy-nilly emperors; in the 1964 “Zur Person” (The Person) interview, Arendt answers questions about her youth and the influence of her mother.”

“When asked about 1933 Germany, the year the Nazis came into power,” closed Brickner, “Arendt’s response echoes the Unrepresented of any age. ‘Indifference,’ she said, ‘was no longer possible in 1933. It was impossible even before that.’”

Brickner has a 1997 political science doctorate from Purdue University and is the author of several political theory books, to include The Promise Keepers: Politics and Promises (1999), Article the first of the Bill of Rights (2006), and The Book of the Is: A book on bridges (2013). The Bryan William Brickner Blog is an ongoing resource for the political science of constitutions and the biological science of receptors.

Tomorrow (20 July) the War Cry Heal Union series continues with ~ Civil War Battle Flags, Medals of Honor and Soldiers Unknown.


Contact

  • Bryan W. Brickner
    Ew Publishing
    +1 773-308-3777
    Email
  • Steve Young
    Ew Publishing
    630-254-8243
    Email

Attachments

The Book of the Is (2013) The Book of the Is (2013)

Aphorisms: 57-61 Time, Sarajevo and Robert E. Lee