Strong, Beautiful Indiana Limestone Invokes Historic Construction For All Saints Anglican Church in Springfield, Missouri

Share Article

The church, designed by Marshall Waters Woody Architects and built by Brian Beckers Construction, embodies traditional construction, both in its graceful presentation and in the use of real Indiana limestone.

News Image

All Saints Anglican Church, Springfield, Mo. Photo by Gayle Babcock.

Natural stone brings a character not seen in other materials.

Exterior limestone quarried in Indiana imparts to the new All Saints Anglican Church in Springfield, Mo., beauty, visible permanence, and a connection with ecclesiastical architectural history. All these elements, essential considerations for both the congregation and the architects who designed the structure, guided the selection of stone from Indiana Limestone Co., Oolitic, Ind.

The church, designed by Marshall Waters Woody Architects and built by Brian Beckers Construction, both of Springfield, embodies traditional construction, both in its graceful presentation and in the use of real stone.

An ambitious project made possible by the contributions of generous donors, construction is being carried out in three main parts. Phase one was the erection of the actual church, parish hall and kitchen. An ongoing second and third phase is the construction of an educational wing and a columbarium. An integral part of the second phase is a colonnade connection between the school section and the church.

Bill Woody, principal at Marshall Waters Woody, said an early part of his firm’s work on the project was intensive research regarding the use of buttressing and arched windows. “We sought to be as true to a period Anglican church as we could,” Woody said.

The firm’s use of Indiana limestone was essential in the architects’ efforts to present a structure projecting spirituality and sacred contemplation. “Natural stone brings a character not seen in other materials,” Woody said. “Stone is solidity, speaking to a strong structure with real peace of mind.”

John Simmons, chair of the church’s building committee, said the project has been years in the making. “We had rented space in a Lutheran church for five years,” he said. When the growing congregation outpaced the room available for them there, they sought and found land for a church of their own in Springfield, purchasing first a 17-acre estate, then another five-acre parcel contiguous to the land they’d already bought.

Ground was broken for the structure in 2011. Phase 1, with more than 12,000 square feet under roof, embraces the sanctuary, with day chapel and narthex as well as a kitchen-equipped parish hall, administrative areas, sacristy and priest’s office. Phase 2, something less than half that size, includes the education section and an arched stone colonnade to the parking lot. Still to be completed are the columbarium and patio area off the parish hall, and an area with a gated portal reserved for personal contemplation and reflection.

In addition to the architectural firm, other companies from the Springfield area were chosen to handle essential phases of the project. Brian Beckers Construction was general contractor and John M. Gill Masonry Co. was the masonry contractor. Both Beckers and Gill lauded the ease with which the stone could be handled and applied. Earthworks of Perryville, Mo. fabricated and supplied the project stone.

As the original quarry provider of stone for the project, Indiana Limestone Co. offered valuable technical support throughout the design and construction phases so far, assisting all participants with information that has saved time, helped restrain costs and contributed to superlative results.

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Duffe Elkins
Visit website

Media