Autism Society of North Carolina to Expand its Summer Camp

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Camp Royall will offer more day camp spots in 2015 so that more individuals with autism can enjoy the life-changing experience of summer camp.

The Autism Society of North Carolina is expanding its summer camp offerings this year, enabling more individuals with autism to learn new skills, have fun, and make friends at Camp Royall.

The Autism Society of North Carolina (ASNC) has been offering summer camp for more than 40 years for individuals with autism of all ages. Camp Royall, a 133-acre facility in Moncure open since 1997, is the oldest and largest camp exclusively for individuals with autism in the United States.

Registration is open for summer 2015 through February 24 at http://www.camproyall.org. Camp Royall will again offer its weeklong, overnight camp for 10 weeks. Demand is so high for this camp each year that ASNC must hold a lottery to designate spots and campers may attend only one overnight week.

This year, Camp Royall will offer more day camp slots, and individuals will be allowed to attend multiple weeks. Registration for day camp is on a first come, first served basis and is separate from the overnight lottery system.

Camp Royall provides a caring, accepting atmosphere that celebrates the individuality of campers ages 4 to adult. The counselor-to-camper ratio is 1:1 or 1:2 based on self-help and behavioral needs, and counselors receive a full week of intensive, hands-on training by autism professionals.

Camp Royall also provides needed respite for families and peace of mind that their children are in a safe and loving environment. After spending time at camp, campers show increases in confidence, independence, and a willingness to try new things, their families report.

To learn more about Camp Royall, go to http://www.camproyall.org or contact Director Sara Gage at 919-542-1033 or camproyall(at)autismsociety-nc(dot)org.

Background:

  • Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a lifelong developmental disability that typically appears during the first three years of life. Recent studies estimate that up to 1 of every 58 children born in North Carolina will be affected by ASD.
  • For more than 44 years, the Autism Society of North Carolina has worked to address areas of need and expand services for the autism community in North Carolina. ASNC works to directly improve the lives of individuals affected by autism by providing advocacy, education, and services.
  • For more information, call 1-800-442-2762 or visit http://www.autismsociety-nc.org.

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David Laxton
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