Forbes: New Dietary Guidelines on Cholesterol Suggest that 50 Years of Medical Advice Was Wrong; The Center for the Biology of Chronic Disease (CBCD) Reviews the Report

Share Article

In contrast, the health paradigm shift on cholesterol, which was described in Forbes (Forbes.com on February 12, 2015) (1), was anticipated by Microcompetition Theory Published in 2003.

News Image
The new dietary recommendations, based on new research that shows no association between cholesterol and heart disease, should be no surprise to those who read Dr. Hanan Polansky’s book, which was published more than 12 years ago. - Greg Bennett, CBCD

Cholesterol in the diet or in the blood does not increase risk of heart disease, according to new research. In fact, shocking new cholesterol guidelines have been released by the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee based on this new data. There is a paradigm that has been accepted by the medical community regarding cholesterol since 1961. This standard stated that there is both “good” and “bad” cholesterol, and when an individual eats certain foods, it increases “bad” cholesterol in the blood, which in turn can lead to heart disease. This paradigm has been shattered by new research.

A summary of the committee’s December 2014 meeting says “Cholesterol is not considered a nutrient of concern for over consumption.” (See Harvard.edu, from February 12, 2015) (2) In other words, “You don’t need to worry about cholesterol in your food.” (2)

Professor Dan Rader said that “most of the cholesterol in our blood is not derived from our diets. Every cell in your body makes cholesterol. The old guidelines were based on a wrong assumption. We now know that cholesterol in the diet makes very little difference in terms of bad cholesterol in blood.” (1) He continued, saying that “the scandal here is that it’s taking so long for science to get incorporated into nutritional guidelines.” (1) Professor Rader is a professor of molecular medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

But, if cholesterol is not the cause of heart disease, what is?

According to the CBCD, the answer is latent viruses.

More than one study has linked viruses to heart disease. In fact, both the human papillomavirus (HPV) and the varicella zoster virus (VZV) have been linked to cardiovascular disease. For instance, “Women infected with the human papillomavirus, or HPV, are two to three times as likely as uninfected women to have had a heart attack or stroke, according to a report published in The Journal of the American College of Cardiology.” (See the New York Times, from October 24, 2011) (3).

Another study found that VZV “is an independent risk factor for vascular disease.” (See the journal Neurology, from January 21, 2014) (4).

The Epstein Barr Virus (EBV), which is more common than HPV or VZV, is also linked to heart disease. “Looking at blood samples from 299 heart patients, researchers at Ohio State University found that those who had suffered a heart attack were the most likely to have inflammatory proteins circulating in their blood compared to patients with less acute symptoms. And having more of one of these proteins in the blood was linked to the presence of antibodies that signal a latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation.” (See News-Medical.net, from January 23, 2013) (6).

CMV is another common virus, which is linked to heart problems. “Cytomegalovirus was found to be the most common specific finding in immunocompetent patients (people with healthy immune systems) with fatal myocarditis.” (See Clinical Infectious Diseases, from March 1, 2005) (7).

“The new dietary recommendations, based on new research that shows no association between cholesterol and heart disease, should be no surprise to those who read Dr. Hanan Polansky’s book entitled ‘Microcompetition with Foreign DNA and the Origin of Chronic Disease.’” - Greg Bennett, CBCD

According to Dr. Polansky, the cause of heart disease, and other major diseases, is a latent infection with common viruses, including HPV, VZV, EBV, and CMV. Moreover, this theory also explains why the HPV study reports that “about 20 percent of patients with heart disease lack obvious risk factors (such as levels of saturated fat in the bloodstream).” (3)

How do latent viruses cause heart disease?

According to Dr. Hanan Polansky’s theory, these viruses are genetic parasites. In high concentrations, they microcompete with the human genes, “starve” these genes, and force them to behave as if they’ve been mutated, that is, to behave as if they are broken.
The Theory of Microcompetition is far-reaching. It applies to many viruses, many genes, and many diseases.

The CBCD encourages doctors and other healthcare professionals to read Dr. Polansky’s book, which predicted that viruses would be the cause of most major diseases, including heart disease, more than ten years ago. “The concept of Microcompetition (or Starved Gene) will change our approach in the study of chronic diseases and will furthermore give scientists a higher level of understanding in biology.” - Dr. Marc Pouliot, PhD (See more reviews of Dr. Polansky’s book at: http://www.cbcd.net/reviews.htm )

For a free copy of Dr. Polansky’s book, and to learn more about the Theory of Microcompetition, visit http://www.cbcd.net and click on free download.

References:

(1) Faye, F. "Why Eggs And Other Cholesterol-Laden Foods Pose Little Or No Health Risk." Published on February 12, 2015. Forbes.com.
http://www.forbes.com/sites/fayeflam/2015/02/12/why-eggs-and-other-cholesterol-laden-foods-pose-little-or-no-health-risk/

(2) Skerrett, Patrick J. "Panel suggests that dietary guidelines stop warning about cholesterol in food." Published on February 12, 2015. Harvard Health
http://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/panel-suggests-stop-warning-about-cholesterol-in-food-201502127713

(3) The New York Times - Troubles With Heart Are Linked to HPV. Published on October 24, 2011.
nytimes.com/2011/10/25/health/research/25theory.html?_r=0

(4) Herpes zoster as a risk factor for stroke and TIA: a retrospective cohort study in the UK. Published on January 21, 2014.
ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24384645

(5) Polansky, H. Itzkovitz, E. Gene-Eden-VIR Is Antiviral: Results of a Post Marketing Clinical Study. Published in September 2013.
http://www.scirp.org/journal/PaperInformation.aspx?PaperID=36101#.U-s9ouOSz90

(6) News Medical - EBV reactivation can increase risk of heart disease.
Published on January 23, 2013
news-medical.net/news/20130123/EBV-reactivation-can-increase-risk-of-heart-disease.aspx

(7) Cytomegalovirus infection of the heart is common in patients with fatal myocarditis. Published on March 1, 2005.
ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15714413

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Greg Bennett
CBCD
+1 5852509999
Email >
Visit website