Carl Franklin Releases "Music to Code By" for when Focus is Required

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Software developer/musician Carl Franklin releases album of music to help listeners achieve a state of "flow" and stay there.

Carl Franklin's "Music to Code By" (http://mtcb.pwop.com) and other music like it seems to help you stay focused on tasks that require focus.

Music to Code By

'Music to Code By' (http://mtcb.pwop.com), Franklin's latest, contains three 25-minute tracks of instrumental music specifically designed to help software developers stay in a state of 'flow' while writing code.

Carl Franklin has just released another album, but this time the focus is, well, focus. "Music to Code By" (http://mtcb.pwop.com), Franklin's latest, contains three 25-minute tracks of instrumental music specifically designed to help software developers stay in a state of "flow" while writing code.

Franklin developed the music in response to an interview on his podcast, ".NET Rocks!" with Mark Seeman. Seeman was talking about the challenges software developers face when trying to stay focused on the complex task of writing software, which requires juggling mental maps of abstractions and how they relate to each other.

In his research, Franklin found that music at 60 to 80 BPM (beats per minute) was optimal. He wanted to avoid new-age or ambient music, opting instead for music with a groove. Furthermore, the music could neither be boring nor distracting. This is a challenge for artists who typically produce music designed to be attention-getting. He also decided to make the tracks 25 minutes in length, which fits nicely with the Pomodoro Technique (http://pomodorotechnique.com/), a time management system that's becoming popular among developers. The album has three tracks entitled Blue, Orange, and Yellow.

To his surprise, not only did developers rave about MTCB, but he received several reports about it being used for other tasks like driving long distances, doing housework, or calming anxious pets and fussy babies.

In an increasingly popular move, Franklin funded "Music to Code By" via crowd-sourcing. He started a Kickstarter campaign to raise $7,500 in 30 days. At the end of 30 days he had raised $10,000 and had 369 backers. After the music was complete he made it available for the backers to download, and the tweet storm began. He immediately started taking orders on his studio's web store, selling another 120 copies in just a couple weeks.

Franklin plans to release more of this type of music, as well as an app called "Music to Flow By" later this year. MTFB would combine access to the MTCB music (and more as they become available) with a task timer (see the Pomodoro Technique) and an API to let software developers write code to control lights, "do not disturb" signs, email replies, etc., in order to minimize distractions.

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