Certified Culinary Medicine Specialist Program Jointly Launched by Goldring Center for Culinary Medicine at Tulane University and Cardiometabolic Risk Summit

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Groundbreaking professional certification program trains clinicians in culinary medicine.

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Diet plus medication is synergistic, and clinicians who can speak confidently about nutrition have a major advantage in the effort to change the habits of their patients.

Building off their success and reputation as leading providers of continuing medical education, the Cardiometabolic Risk Summit and Goldring Center for Culinary Medicine at Tulane University are proud to announce a pioneering professional certification program in Culinary Medicine. The interdisciplinary program, which ultimately grants a Certified Culinary Medicine Specialist (CCMS) credential, is designed for physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, registered dietitians, and pharmacists seeking to optimize their management of diet-related chronic diseases through enhanced nutritional knowledge and culinary skill.

The CCMS program will now provide practicing clinicians with access to the same revolutionary education that originated within the nation’s first hands-on medical school teaching kitchen at the Goldring Center for Culinary Medicine at Tulane University.

To establish eligibility for the certification examination, candidates must obtain a minimum of sixty (60) credit hours, including completion of:

  • Approved online nutrition education coursework
  • At least twelve (12) credit hours of hands-on participation at approved Culinary Medicine Teaching Kitchen Modules
  • Two online post-tests assessing knowledge of important culinary and nutrition texts
  • Live-conference credits at the Cardiometabolic Risk Summit Spring or Fall conference (optional)

The Teaching Kitchen Modules, an innovative hallmark of the CCMS program, provide candidates with a one-of-a-kind opportunity for hands on learning. Important nutrition concepts are taught through an evidence-based, interactive case-based discussion on dietary education for patients, followed by a hands-on cooking class that emphasizes the practical dialogue clinicians can have with their patients about lifestyle change.

“Diet plus medication is synergistic, and clinicians who can speak confidently about nutrition have a major advantage in the effort to change the habits of their patients,” said Timothy S. Harlan, CCMS Faculty Chair. “CCMS provides clinicians evidence-based strategies for how to best integrate nutritional counseling with pharmacological treatment and how to effectively educate patients about weight loss.”

Conferred upon examination, candidates will obtain the “CCMS” title designation, recognizing their unique foundation for incorporating healthy eating into patients' diets through a comprehensive knowledge of nutrition and the culinary techniques to prepare food that is consistent with real-world budgets, time constraints, and nutritional ideals.

For more details or to apply for the Certified Culinary Medicine Specialist program, please visit: http://culinarymedicinecertified.com/.

About Cardiometabolic Risk Summit

Powered by Consultant, the nation’s leading, peer-reviewed journal for primary care practitioners, the Cardiometabolic Risk Summit is dedicated to translating the latest clinical research on cardiometabolic risk into practical treatment and prevention strategies for the entire primary care team. Powerful, evidence-based sessions spanning the broad spectrum of topics inherent to cardiometabolic risk syndrome, including: Obesity, Diabetes, Dyslipidemia, Hypertension, and Clinical Nutrition provide practitioners with the vital tools necessary to effectively prevent and treat cardiometabolic risk.

About Goldring Center for Culinary Medicine at Tulane University

The Goldring Center for Culinary Medicine at Tulane University is the nation’s first dedicated teaching kitchen to be implemented at a medical school. The Center provides hands-on training for medical students through culinary medicine classes in the form of electives and seminars, as well as continuing education for the healthcare and foodservice industries. The Center’s programs provide primary care clinicians with a knowledgebase of diet, lifestyle, and nutrition, and how they relate to disease. Modules are taught from the food-first perspective with an eye toward the practical aspects of what patients face day-to-day when trying to make substantive change in their lives.

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Corey Krejcik