OGWA "Spray to Drink" System Helps Patients Fight Dehydration

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A five-year-old company in Park City, Utah, believes it has the answer to rehydrating patients before, during and after hospitalization. OGWA Corp. has developed a newly-patented hydration system featuring a pressurized fluid reservoir that works in tandem with a pressure-resistant leakproof valve to spray high volumes of fluid into the mouth.

For patients, it’s like having a private water fountain.

Severe dehydration, a medical emergency, can cause a litany of symptoms, ranging from sunken eyes, shriveled and dry skin that lacks elasticity, low blood pressure, and dangerously rapid breathing and heart rate, according to MayoClinic.org. Stroke and heart attack risks increase with dehydration, and cognitive function is the first to suffer. Death is possible if dehydration is left untreated; immediate fluid rehydration is usually the best solution.

A five-year-old company in Park City, Utah, believes it has the answer to rehydrating patients before, during and after hospitalization. OGWA Corp. has developed a newly-patented hydration system featuring a pressurized fluid reservoir that works in tandem with a pressure-resistant leakproof valve to spray high volumes of fluid into the mouth.

The reservoir contains two chambers – one for fluid, the other for pressurized air created by a manually operated pump. The 100 oz. bladder provides “spray to drink” convenience; its internal partition prevents the reservoir from ballooning out of shape.

OGWA CEO Harlan Gardiner says of the OGWA hydration system, “spraying allows patients to take in much more water much more quickly with much less work. It’s like having a private water fountain,” he says.

For assisted care facilities populated by less-mobile and recovering elderly patients, the gentle, efficient flow of water or liquid nutrition from an OGWA system provides a spill-free, high volume, measurable solution to day-to-day care.

“I know from experience how frustrating it is for nurses to deliver fluids to elderly, weak, confused patients. Even post-operatively, otherwise healthy patients may be too weak to pick up cups without spillage, and too weak to suck on straws,” said Steven Hodes, M.D., a gastroenterologist presently Senior Attending in Medicine both at Raritan Bay Medical Center in Perth Amboy, N.J., and John F. Kennedy Medical Center in Edison, N.J.

“With this technology a measured amount of water could be literally shot into their mouths – but not too much to induce aspiration into the lungs. The OGWA hydration system would absolutely facilitate this aspect of nursing care, saving manhours and the time-consuming clean-up of spills.”

Hodes continues, “The technology would allow them to be more independent and require less nursing attention.”

Not only does the bite valve permit easy spraying, but since the water is pressurized it can force itself through an inline filter that cleans dirty water before drinking, making the OGWA system attractive as a component in emergency preparedness kits as well.

OGWA is looking to present the technology to companies in various markets for sale or licensing. For more information: Harlan Gardiner, 800 532 0530, hgardiner(at)ogwacorp(dot)com, ogwacorp.com.

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Jeff Blumenfeld
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