Effects from Record Snow Far From Over

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The amount of snow received this year, coupled with the cold temperatures that prevented much of it from melting, can wreak havoc on lawns and shrubs, according to Jim Campanella, founder of Lawn Dawg, the Northeast’s largest independent lawn service company.

With the amount of snow we had this year and the colder temperatures, the snow just isn't melting as quickly. That combination of factors can can spell a number of problems for lawns

This year’s record snowfall caused all sorts of problems for homeowners in the Northeast. But those problems may not be over. The amount of snow received, coupled with the colder temperatures that prevented much of it from melting, can wreak havoc on lawns and shrubs, according to Jim Campanella, founder of Lawn Dawg, the Northeast’s largest independent lawn service company.

“What we’re seeing in all of our branch areas is that we’re weeks behind a typical schedule of snow melt for this time of year,” said Campanella. “With the amount of snow we had this year, the snow banks are higher, there was more ice melt and other chemicals applied to the roads and walkways and the colder temperatures are preventing the snow from melting as quickly. That combination of factors can spell a number of problems for lawns.”

From lawn tunnels to mold to grasses that wake up much later than normal, homeowners could be in for a challenging spring.

“During the winter while lawns are dormant, moles and voles are busy feeding and digging tunnels underneath the snow,” said Lawn Dawg Staff Agronomist Bob Mann. “When lawns are actively growing, the damage is minimal. But when they are inactive, it can look like a racetrack. Additionally, with the snow taking much longer to melt, it's a recipe for disaster.”

Foraging wildlife isn’t a homeowners only concern.

“Snow mold is one of the most common issues we see in the spring during normal winters,” said Mann. “It’s a type of fungus and turf disease that damages or kills grass after snow melts, typically in late winter and early spring. This year, we’re already prepping our customers on what to look for and our lawn specialists are prepared for a higher number of issues.”

Homeowners should also be prepared to experience more brown this spring.

“Different species of grasses wake up at different times. With colder temperatures and a later start to the season, homeowner’s may see lawns that greened in April not start until much later,” said Mann.

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Jenna Richardson
Lawn Dawg
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