MMR Vaccines Strongly Recommended in Light of Recent Mumps and Measles Outbreaks

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Recently IMU Southwest—an immunization clinic based in the Houston metro area—strongly recommended that people get the MMR immunization. This announcement was made in light of the recent measles and mumps outbreak that occurred in Idaho and Washington.

IMU Southwest, The Immunization Clinic

The best protection against MMR is to give children two doses of the MMR vaccine. The first one should be administered when the child is 12 to 15 months old. The second one should be given between the ages of 4 and 6.

Recently IMU Southwest—an immunization clinic based in the Houston metro area—strongly recommended that people get the MMR immunization. This announcement was made in light of the recent measles and mumps outbreak that occurred in Idaho and Washington. The "MMR" in MMR immunization stands for a trio of infections: measles, mumps, and rubella. Children are at a much higher risk of developing these conditions than older people.

Named after the virus that causes it, measles is a highly contagious infection that is characterized by a rash that spreads over the body. The measles virus spreads through the air through coughing and sneezing; and symptoms such as fever, coughing, runny nose, red eyes, and sore throat can indicate the onset of measles. Rubella is a version of measles that is caused by the rubella virus; it is also known as German measles or three-day measles to indicate the length of the condition's duration. While milder than traditional measles, rubella usually starts in the face and spreads to the rest of the body. Also highly contagious is mumps, which caused by the mumps virus. Also known as epidemic parotitis, mumps starts with signs that include fever, muscle pain, fatigue, and headaches. It is characterized by painful swelling of one or both parotid glands.

The best protection against MMR is to give children two doses of the MMR vaccine. The first one should be administered when the child is 12 to 15 months old. The second one should be given between the ages of 4 and 6. IMU Southwest recommends that everyone review pertinent vaccine records before travel. Special attention should be paid to children, particularly those between the ages of 4 and 6. Parents are encouraged to immunize their children once they reach 4 years of age, instead of waiting until the 1st grade, especially if they have not received their second booster.

About IMU Southwest:

Established in 2009, IMU Southwest is an immunization clinic that provides residents of the Houston area with a variety of medical services. In addition to vaccines, the clinic performs blood tests, skin tests for tuberculosis, injections, and drug, titer, and blood testing. IMU Southwest is a Certified Yellow Fever Vaccination Clinic by the Centers for Disease Control. Additionally, the clinic is registered with the Department of State Health Services and accredited by the Houston Better Business Bureau. IMU Southwest is currently headquartered at 3727 Greenbriar Drive, Suite 403, Stafford, TX 77477. However, starting from September 1, 2015, IMU Southwest will be at its new location, which is 16225 Park Ten Place, Suite 519, Houston, TX 77084. The telephone number is 281-313-7468, and the email address is houstonvaccines(at)gmail(dot)com. The IMU Southwest website is http://www.houstonvaccines.com.

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Lauren Steele
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