Tennessee Sees an Increase in Hepatitis C Infections from Intravenous Heroin Use

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Drug Rehab Nashville comments on Times Free Press’ recent article.

Drug Rehab Nashville
The stigma revolving safe needle exchange programs is politically founded and has no empirical standing. States who have implemented similar needle exchange programs reduce their exposure to communicable diseases.

According to an article published by the Times Free Press on July 10th the infection rate of hepatitis C has increased in Tennessee stemming from intravenous drug use. Intravenous drug use causes more overdoses and is responsible for putting many heroin users and medical professionals at risk for contracting communicable diseases including Hepatitis B and C and HIV. Drug treatment facilities in Tennessee have witnessed an increase in patients for heroin addiction treatment. Interstate 75 has been scrutinized as a main venue of heroin disbursement and is projected to remain a source of heroin distribution. Drug Rehab Nashville is a drug and alcohol addiction treatment facility specializing in heroin rehab in Nashville. The rise of heroin related patients have prompted the facility to vouch for needle exchange programs in response to the danger of communicable diseases transmitted from intravenous drug use.

An associate from Drug Rehab Nashville comments,

“Many don’t understand, or acknowledge, the danger medical professionals are in when they treat patients who come in with communicable diseases. Safe needle exchange programs, easily fundable by the state, would decrease the infection rate of communicable diseases for communities and health care professionals. Additionally, recovering addicts don’t need their sobriety compounded by potentially live threatening diseases which are easily preventable, given access to the resources so many states already have available for their communities.

“The stigma revolving safe needle exchange programs is politically founded and has no empirical standing. States who have implemented similar needle exchange programs reduce their exposure to communicable diseases.”

Opiate overdose reversal medications may be on the horizon for Tennessee as the heroin epidemic doesn’t show any signs of ceasing. According to Times Free Press, two bills have passed to address overdose deaths. First Responders will be allowed to carry naloxone. The drug reverses the effects of an overdose by uncompromising the central nervous system, allowing overdose victims to breathe again.

The second bill passed is a good samaritan law allowing those involved with illegal drug activities to call emergency responders in the event of an overdose without penalty.

Drug Rehab Nashville offers specialized alcohol rehab in Nashville and helps those with drug and alcohol use disorders recover with extensive medical and therapeutic treatment. The drug and alcohol treatment center is dedicated to helping clients unearth the underlying catalysts of addiction to prevent relapse after treatment. The treatment center accepts most major insurances and provides tuition assistance in some cases.

For more information about Drug Rehab Nashville visit http://drugrehabnashville.org/ or call (615)348-5866.

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