Mini-In Vitro Fertilization Experience of Pennsylvania-based Infertility Solutions, P.C. to Be Published in Leading Medical Journal

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Reproductive specialist's approach to minimal stimulation IVF and its expected outcome to be featured in official journal of the International Society for Mild Approaches in Assisted Reproduction

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Mini-IVF's advantage over natural cycle IVF is a very low cycle cancelation rate compared to natural cycle IVF (5% compared to up to 30% due to premature LH surges) while maintaining an outcome at least as good as natural.

Infertility Solutions’ experience with Mini-IVF has been accepted for publication in the medical journal: Facts, Views, and Vision in Obgyn (Volume 7, 2015). Facts, Views, and Vision in Obgyn is the official journal of ISMAAR, the International Society for Mild Approaches in Assisted Reproduction. ISMAAR was founded with the aim of promoting education, training and research into mild approaches in assisted reproduction, in particular, and women’s reproductive health, in general.

Our publication reviews the experience of Infertility Solutions’ version of minimal stimulation IVF, namely, Mini-IVF. This approach falls between natural and modified natural cycle IVF, in which the objective is to produce one egg, and minimal stimulation IVF, in which the objective is to produce 2 to 8 eggs and for which GnRH antagonists are used to increase the number of eggs retrieved. Mini-IVF aims to produce one or two embryos. Its advantage over natural cycle IVF is a very low cycle cancelation rate compared to natural cycle IVF (5% compared to up to 30% due to premature LH surges) while maintaining an outcome at least as good as natural cycle IVF.

The patient friendliness of Mini-IVF is reflected in the average use of injectable medications by patients, which was 11 ampules of medications (compared to 30-100 in conventional IVF) and a peak estrogen level of 625 pg/ml (similar to a natural cycle). There will always be uncertainty about the long term impact of super physiological estrogen levels. The average cycle required only three office visits, three blood samples and a total of only 7 subcutaneous injections. This was significantly less than what is required for conventional IVF.

The patients studied in this publication, on average, had decreased ovarian reserve (had used up most of their eggs), which is associated with poor IVF outcomes. However, overall, the pregnancy rate was 25% per cycle with a 19.2% delivery rate (per transfer). There was only one multiple gestation (4.3%). Of the 104 transfers, 52% involved a single embryo. The cost of a cycle was one-third to one-half of a typical IVF cycle.

Although Mini-IVF is not the best choice for everyone, it is a reasonable option before undertaking conventional IVF. It should be especially attractive to those patients who need IVF for well identified problems such as a severe sperm problem or missing tubes and also for those patients who don’t like the idea of producing many more embryos than they need to achieve pregnancy. This paper provides a guide to the expected outcome to the use of this protocol.

Infertility Solutions, P.C.
Lehigh Valley Office

1275 S. Cedar Crest Blvd., Suite #3, Allentown, PA 18103
phone (610) 776-1217 | fax (610) 776-4149

Scranton/Wilkes Barre Office

301 West Grove Street, Clarks Summit, PA 18411
phone (570) 504-8548

Out-of-Town Patients

1-877-258-2217

http://www.infertilitysolutions.com/

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Dr. Bruce Rose