Volunteer Minister Leaders Train at New Center in Ongoing Efforts to Help Quake-Ravaged Nepal

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The new Volunteer Minister center in Kathmandu is a busy crossroads, providing training to young volunteers from across Nepal to establish and operate Volunteer Ministers groups in villages throughout the country.

Volunteer Minister team leaders, at the permanent Volunteer Minister Center in Kathmandu, are training local leaders in basics skills they can use to establish groups in their towns and villages, helping to bring relief to their communities.

Volunteer Minister team leaders, at the permanent Volunteer Minister Center in Kathmandu, are training local leaders in basics skills they can use to establish groups in their towns and villages, help

The emergency is not over yet

Three months have passed since the eyes of the international community were riveted on Nepal, with earthquakes razing entire villages, toppling centuries-old legacy sites, killing some 9,000, and leaving some $5 billion in damage—an estimated 25 percent of the nation’s GDP.

As recently as July 24, the UN Humanitarian Coordinator in Nepal warned “The emergency is not over yet,” a fact witnessed daily by the hundreds of Volunteer Ministers still actively providing relief in the country.

Volunteer Ministers in Nepal are making it a two-pronged effort now:

  • Continue to respond to the disaster, distributing humanitarian relief, setting up tents and carrying out construction projects in villages in need of help.
  • Providing training for group leaders who will return to their villages to train other volunteers and provide one-on-one help.

This week, Volunteer Ministers and VM-trained Scout teams carried on demolishing collapsed buildings, cleaning up villages and clearing roads of rubble and debris in the districts of Nuwakot, Lalitpur, Sindhupalchowk, Dhading, Bhaktapur, Rasuwa, Kavreplanchowk and Okhaldhunga.

Meanwhile, the training of new district group leaders at the Volunteer Ministers Center continued, with the first 51 completing their basic lineup of five courses:

  • From The Scientology Handbook, courses on communication, Study Technology, and Scientology “assists,”—techniques developed by Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard that address the emotional and spiritual factors related to injuries and illnesses.
  • Fundamental first aid skills, and
  • Construction basics

With these skills, Volunteer Ministers leaders are returning to their homes, training volunteers and mobilizing teams to carry out reconstruction projects and deal with the emotional and spiritual needs of the millions of Nepali whose lives were completely shattered by the disaster.

The Volunteer Ministers program was expressly intended for use by both Scientologists and non-Scientologists alike. Anyone of any culture or creed may train as a Volunteer Minister and use these tools to help their families and communities. And all are welcome to do so.

Equipped with effective technology to resolve virtually any difficulty, Volunteer Ministers live by the motto: “No matter the problem, something can be done about it.”

About The Volunteer Ministers

Transcending all ethnic, cultural and religious boundaries, the Volunteer Ministers program is there for anyone in need of help. Volunteer Ministers training is available free of charge through the Scientology Volunteer Ministers website to anyone who wishes to help others.

The Church of Scientology has published a brochure, Scientology How We Help: Scientology Volunteer Ministers—Something Can be Done About It, to meet requests for more information about the program. To learn more or read a copy of the brochure, visit the Scientology website: http://www.scientology.org/how-we-help/volunteer-ministers.html

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