Engineering and Science Hall of Fame to Induct Three New Members

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Biannual event to be held Thursday, Nov. 5, 6 p.m., at The Engineer’s Club of Dayton. Alexander Graham Bell, inventor of telephone, leads list of inductees. Other inductees include John W. Lincoln, world leader in aircraft structural technology, and Bradford W. Parkinson, father of GPS technology.

Alexander Graham Bell

Inductees for 2015 include: Alexander Graham Bell (pictured), inventor of the telephone; John W. Lincoln, world leader in aircraft structural technology; and Bradford W. Parkinson, father of global positioning system (GPS) technology.

The Engineering and Science Hall of Fame (ESHF), an international nonprofit organization honoring persons who have made outstanding contributions to engineering and science which have improved the quality of life for humankind, will induct three new members during a ceremony on Thursday, Nov. 5, at The Engineer’s Club of Dayton, 110 East Monument Avenue.

Inductees for 2015 include: Alexander Graham Bell, inventor of the telephone; John W. Lincoln, world leader in aircraft structural technology; and Bradford W. Parkinson, father of global positioning system (GPS) technology.

Bell is best known for inventing the telephone in 1876 while residing in the Boston area. The electrical transmission of the human voice over a distance was the result of his work with human speech, telegraphy and electromagnetism. His study of how the ear worked led him to design a diaphragm moved by speech whose motion was turned into an electrical signal that moved a receiving diaphragm, producing sound waves for the listener. The success of his invention established the Bell Telephone Company and AT&T. Bell’s later inventions included kite designs and hydrofoil boats, and, with his wife, Mabel, he organized a team to bring aviation to Canada. He also established Science magazine and was the second president of the National Geographic Society.

Lincoln is recognized as the world leader in aircraft structural design and integrity, which has led to increased safety in military and commercial aircrafts. After beginning his career as a pilot for Lincoln Airlines (his father’s business), he spent the next 22 years as a structural engineer and designer at Vought Aerospace. In 1971, he brought this experience to the Aeronautical Systems Division of the United States Air Force (USAF) at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base and accumulated another 29 years of service to both military and commercial structural integrity processes. He also served as a senior technical advisor to the Federal Aviation Administration. His aircraft designs and leadership over more than 50 years have led to excellent aircraft structural safety records for the USAF and commercial aircrafts.

Parkinson is an engineer, inventor and colonel in the USAF. His work was instrumental in the development of modern GPS systems. After two years of active duty in the USAF, Parkinson went to MIT and earned his master’s degree in engineering in 1961. He was assigned to the Central Inertial Guidance Test Facility at Holloman Air Force Base and then went to Stanford University to earn his Ph.D. in 1966. After a tour of Vietnam, he led the USAF 621B program for satellite navigation. Within six years, the team had developed a working GPS prototype. Parkinson remains active as professor emeritus at Stanford, and he and other researchers continue to find new applications for GPS technology.

Cheryl McHenry, news anchor, WHIO-TV, will serve as master of ceremonies. The cost to attend the dinner is $60 and is open to the public. Individuals can register online by clicking here or by calling 937-228-2148.

On Friday, Nov. 6, the inductees or their representatives will speak and interact with high school students and teachers at the Engineers Club of Dayton from 10 a.m. to noon.

About Engineering and Science Hall of Fame (http://www.eshalloffame.org)
The Engineering and Science Hall of Fame is an international organization established to honor engineers and scientists who, using scientific and engineering principles, have made a significant contribution to human well-being. Its specific purposes are to: recognize outstanding engineers and scientists who have made significant contributions benefiting humanity through an individual contribution using engineering or scientific principles; foster an understanding of the impact of these contributions on the world; encourage careers in engineering and science by exposing students to outstanding scientists and engineers; and establish and maintain an archive to support the continuing education of students and their teachers.

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