American College of Lifestyle Medicine Supports Work of 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee

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The American College of Lifestyle Medicine today announced it is reaffirming its unwavering support of the work of the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee.

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The report of the 2015 DGAC represents dietary guidance based on the weight of evidence, and the consensus of genuinely expert opinion; the ACLM issues its strong support for the methods and members of the committee.

In light of a recent commentary in the British Medical Journal questioning the integrity of the US Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee for 2015 and the veracity of their work, the American College of Lifestyle Medicine (ACLM) formally reaffirms its support for the Committee, and its report.

While the commentary and commentator in the BMJ were not required to meet any particular standards of expertise and impartiality, the DGAC members were subject to the strictest requirements for both. Only experts highly regarded and widely supported by comparably expert peers were eligible, and any real or apparent conflict of interest required exclusion from the group. The 572 page report diligently reviews relevant evidence. ACLM’s stance is that claims to the contrary because of a different opinion regarding the report’s conclusion do not rise to the level of legitimate academic debate.

“The report of the 2015 DGAC represents dietary guidance based on the weight of evidence, and the consensus of genuinely expert opinion,” said George Guthrie, MD, ACLM president-elect. “The ACLM issues its strong support for the methods and members of the committee, and for the contents of their report, and urges the federal authorities to base the actual Dietary Guidelines for Americans on the work of these public health scientists rather than hearsay and conflicted interests.”

Data show that 80% of our nation’s healthcare costs are spent on the treatment of conditions that are lifestyle-related, with dietary pattern recognized as a primary driver.

The official Standards of the American College of Lifestyle Medicine, adopted in 2012, state that 'Nutrition is an essential element of Lifestyle Medicine practice; it is the underlying cause of many lifestyle diseases, and changing eating habits alone can reverse many lifestyle diseases.'

“I want to reiterate that I think the advisory committee has done a stellar job,” noted ACLM President David Katz, MD. “The official Dietary Guidelines need to reflect science and not special interests or personal opinions—there is too much at stake for us to continue to serve anything other than the public good.”

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About the American College of Lifestyle Medicine (ACLM)
The American College of Lifestyle Medicine (ACLM) is the physician-led medical specialty society in the United States dedicated to the advancement and clinical practice of Lifestyle Medicine as the foundation of a transformed and sustainable healthcare system, wherein lifestyle is used as a therapeutic intervention to prevent, treat, and even reverse the majority of chronic, lifestyle-related diseases by addressing their underlying causes. Visit http://www.lifestylemedicine.org.

About Lifestyle Medicine 2015
Lifestyle Medicine 2015 is the nation’s premier medical conference focused on lifestyle medicine—lifestyle in medicine and lifestyle as medicine. Set for November 1-4, 2015 at the Renaissance Hotel in Nashville, TN, this CME accredited event delivers impressive keynotes, evidence-based educational sessions, research posters, and ample networking activities. Attendees from across the nation and around the world will gather to learn about Integrating Evidence into Practice and lifestyle medicine as the foundation of a transformed healthcare system. Learn more and register at http://www.lifestylemedicine2015.org.

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