Skout’s Halloween Survey Debunks the Myth That Black Cats are Bad Luck

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Skout recently surveyed more than 1,500 people in the U.S. and found that black cats can actually bring about some good luck.

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46% of people who have owned a black cat say they have won a contest or the lottery.

Black cats are a classic symbol of Halloween, and as the holiday approaches, Skout, the global app that helps you meet new people and expand your social circle, set out to explore if the myth holds true of black cats bringing bad luck. Skout recently surveyed more than 1,500 people in the U.S. and found that black cats can actually bring about some good luck…and more than 1/3 of women say they’ve dressed as a black cat for Halloween!

Here are some of the survey highlights:

Think black cats are unlucky? Think again!

  • 59% of people think black cats are actually good luck!

Maybe this is why…black cat owners have better luck than non-black cat owners.

  • 46% of people who have owned a black cat say they have won a contest or the lottery (vs. 40% of people who have never owned a black cat).
  • 64% of people who have owned a black cat have had a near death experience and lived to tell about it (vs. 54% of people who have never owned a black cat).

People who believe black cats are bad luck also believe in ghosts.

  • 63% of people who say black cats are bad luck also believe in ghosts and 59% say they are superstitious.

Irony alert: most people who think black cats are bad luck have black hair.

  • 59% of people who think black cats are bad luck have black hair. Hmmm…

More than 1/3 of women have dressed up as a black cat for Halloween.

  • 35% of women surveyed say they have dressed up as a black cat for Halloween.
  • A black cat costume is especially popular with redheads, 43% of whom say they have worn a black cat costume, and blondes (41%).

Cat owners have more friends!

  • 71% of cat owners have more than 4 friends, compared to 66% of non-cat owners who say the same.

Cat owners love black kitties.

  • Nearly 75% of cat owners have owned a black cat and the same (75%) say they would consider adopting a black cat in the future.

To celebrate Halloween and help cats (of all colors!) at the same time, Skout has partnered with Cat Town, a San Francisco Bay Area-based nonprofit devoted to helping shy, stressed, or older cats find new homes. Cat Town does this through its foster program and the Cat Town Café, a cat café space where cats available to adopt are free-roaming and can show off their personalities in their natural environment. On Halloween, for every virtual black cat or Cat Town sticker Skouters give to each other within the app, Skout will make a donation to Cat Town.

“We love celebrating holidays in a fun, unique way while making a difference in our community,” said Christian Wiklund, co-founder and CEO of Skout. “Our office is full of cat lovers and Halloween seemed like a natural time to focus on black cats. My own cat Baloo is a black cat we adopted from a shelter and he has brought nothing but good luck to my family! We hope everyone will give Cat Town stickers to their friends within the Skout app on October 31st so that we can extend a large show of support to Cat Town. That will certainly bring some much needed luck to all of the cats in need of a forever home."

This survey was conducted online in September 2015 among 1,518 Skout users in the United States. To view an infographic with these findings, visit the Skout blog at http://bit.ly/skoutblackcats.

To download Skout for iOS or Android, or to sign up online, visit http://www.skout.com. You can also find Skout on Facebook and Twitter.

About Skout
Skout is the leading global app for meeting new people and expanding your social circle. The Skout community spans more than 180 countries, is available in 14 languages and can be downloaded on iOS, Android and Windows devices. The Andreessen Horowitz backed company was founded in 2007 and is headquartered in San Francisco. Visit http://www.skout.com to learn more.

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Katy Gaenicke
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