100 Women Who Care Gives $14,500 to Little City’s Art Program

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Suburban Chicago Women's Group Funds will Support Art Program for People with Disabilities

Chicago area women provide funds to artists with autism and other intellectual and developmental disabilities at Little City in Palatine, IL.

Andrea Friedlander, Laurie Richter, Marge Weiss and Wendy Kritt from 100 Women Who Care present $14,500 to support Little City's art program. Artists John King and Wayne Mazurek are shown.

"We know that our donation to support the facilitators at Little City's Center for the Arts will have a significant impact on the lives of the men and women who use the center to express themselves creatively." -- Laurie Richter, 100 Women Who Care

Little City is pleased to announce it has received a $14,500 donation from 100 Women Who Care North Suburban Chicago.

The funds will provide much needed funding for art facilitators at Little City's Center for the Arts. Currently, 10 professional artists serve as facilitators at the Center for the Arts, where they provide guidance for the more than 75 artists with intellectual and developmental disabilities who use the studios and available supplies to create art.

"100 Women Who Care is all about women pooling their resources to help others. We know that our donation to support the facilitators at Little City's Center for the Arts will have a significant impact on the lives of the men and women who use the center to express themselves creatively. We are proud to support their efforts," says Laurie Richter, founder of 100 Women Who Care North Suburban Chicago.

The group’s mission is to use the power of collective giving to make a difference in the north suburbs of Chicago. It meets quarterly to pick a local charity to support, with members each contributing to the cause. The funds from 100 Women Who Care will go a long way toward allowing Little City to continue to provide facilitators, who serve a vital role in the program. Facilitators introduce new materials and techniques to the artists, coordinate larger projects involving more than one artist, and provide suggestions to individual artists on how to complete works.

The facilitators, which are sustained entirely from private donations, are essential to the program. "Each year it is a greater challenge to fully fund this part of the program," says Bev Saiz, Director of Foundation and Government Relations at Little City.

The Center for the Arts offers participants from Little City and other area organizations a place dedicated to allowing them to create art. The program is designed to provide a sense of purpose and empowerment for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The Center for the Arts has received 30 awards during its more than 20-year history.

Artwork by Little City artists has been displayed in local, national and international venues, and it is the subject of "Share My Kingdom," a documentary about three Little City artists with disabilities. The film, made possible through a grant from the Chicago Community Trust, premiered at the Gene Siskel Film Center and is scheduled to be shown Oct. 18 at the Bridgeport Art Center in Chicago.

100 Women Who Care North Suburban Chicago was founded by Laurie Richter of Lincolnshire with assistance from Susan Rubin Elfant of Northbrook, Andrea Friedlander of Deerfield, Ada Kinscherff of Lincolnshire and Stacey Meyer of Deerfield. The group meets quarterly to pick a local charity to support. Any member of the group can nominate a qualified local charity, and three members are randomly selected at each meeting to make a presentation in support of their nomination. At the end of the presentations, the group votes, and each member writes a $100 check to the winning charity. Although the meetings last just one hour, many members come early or stay late for a fun Girls Night Out at the hosting venue. For more information or to join, visit http://www.100WomenWhoCareNSC.com.

Caption Information: Andrea Friedlander of Deerfield, Laurie Richter of Lincolnshire and Wendy Kritt of Lincolnshire were among the members of 100 Women Who Care who presented Little City with $14,500 to support Center for the Arts facilitators. They are joined by Little City artists John King and Wayne Mazurek.

About Little City Foundation:

For more than 50 years, Little City has developed innovative and personalized programs to fully assist and empower children and adults with autism and other intellectual and developmental disabilities. With a commitment to attaining a greater quality of life for Illinois’ most vulnerable citizens, Little City actively promotes choice, person-centered planning and a holistic approach to health and wellness. Little City’s ChildBridge services include in-home personal and family supports, clinical and behavior intervention, 24/7 residential services and special needs foster care and adoption. Little City’s LifePath Adult Services offers a variety of residential options, employment opportunities, home-based services, case management, day supports, Special Olympics, an award-winning Center for the Arts and more. The organization has a 56-acre campus in Palatine and offices in Chicago. For more information, visit http://www.LittleCity.org.

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