Sensory Processing Disorder Foundation’s Announces 18th International 3S Symposium a Success

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On October 9 and 10 parents and professionals gathered in Orlando Florida to learn from world leading Sensory Processing Disorder researchers and clinicians at the 18th Annual International 3S Symposium themed “Sensory and Emotion Regulation: Building Magic Moments”.

Attendees listen to Dr. Sophie Molholm's presentation at the 18th International 3S Symposium in Orlando.

Exciting new research was presented by Sophie Molhom, PhD, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, showing differences in measures of multi sensory integration in children with Sensory Processing Disorder compared to typical controls.

On October 9 and 10 parents and professionals gathered in Orlando Florida to learn from world leading Sensory Processing Disorder researchers and clinicians at the 18th Annual International 3S Symposium themed “Sensory and Emotion Regulation: Building Magic Moments”.

The International 3S Symposium offers an inspiring experience every year organized by the SPD Foundation. This year was no different with the SPD field’s most prominent leaders presenting the latest research and evidence based treatment strategies alongside exhibitors showcasing the newest sensory solutions for professionals and parents.

Exciting new research was presented by Sophie Molhom, PhD, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, showing differences in measures of multi sensory integration in children with Sensory Processing Disorder compared to typical controls. Differences between children with SPD and those with autism spectrum disorder may suggest a divergent neural bases for their sensory processing challenges. Grace Baranek, PhD, OTR/L, of University of North Carolina, enhanced our understanding of the heterogeneity in individuals with ASD by describing new characteristics of their sensory response patterns. Attendees also had the chance to participate in tabletop discussions, enter in the sensory sweepstakes drawings, attend the playground based Pre-Symposium Institute and network with colleagues and parents.

Among the presenters were: Lucy Jane Miller, PhD, OTR/L, SPD Foundation; Grace Baranek, PhD, OTR/L, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Gil Foley, PhD, The New York Center for Child Development and Adelphi University; Lois Gold, OTR, Occupational Therapy Center for Pediatric Therapy, Inc; and Sophie Molholm, PhD, Albert Einstein College of Medicine; Tim Conway, PhD, The Morris Center. Carol Stock Kranowitz, Author of The Out-of-Sync Child delivered a lunch workshop and several other experts in the field presented during the event.

SPD disrupts the daily activities of children and adults around the world, but with intensive research based Occupational Therapy strategies this disorder can be treated so that children and adults can have a much higher quality of life. When SPD, which is neurologically based, goes untreated an individual experiences disruption in the way the brain processes and responds to sensations. This disruption and inability to control responses to the senses drastically affects relationships, learning, emotional regulation and development leaving families and individuals isolated and often feeling hopeless.

ABOUT SENSORY PROCESSING DISORDER FOUNDATION: The Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) Foundation, a Colorado 501(c)(3), is the world leader in research, education, and awareness for Sensory Processing Disorder, a neurological condition that disrupts the daily lives of more than 4 million Americans. The SPD Foundation offers educational programs, conducts SPD research, and provides resources for parents worldwide. Dr. Lucy Jane Miller, widely recognized as a leader in SPD research worldwide, founded the SPD Foundation in 1979. The SPD Foundation provides hope and help to individuals and families living with SPD. For more information, visit SPDFoundation.net or call 303-794-1182.

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