Beverly Hills Rheumatologist Dr. Susan Baker Comments on Actress Selena Gomez’s Lupus Announcement

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Following the former Disney star’s announcement of her diagnosis and treatment for Lupus, Dr. Baker explains what Lupus is and how the disease works

Susan A. Baker, MD, FACR, renowned rheumatologist

Susan A. Baker, MD, FACR, renowned rheumatologist

“Although autoimmune disorders can technically affect anyone, lupus is most commonly diagnosed in young women from the ages of 15 to 40,” said Dr. Baker.

Contrary to earlier media speculation that Selena Gomez may have entered rehab for substance abuse problems, the actress has recently confirmed that she has been in treatment for lupus, according to an ABC News report. Lupus is a chronic autoimmune disorder that affects as many as 1.5 million Americans according to the Lupus Foundation of America.

“While Selena Gomez apparently underwent a form of chemotherapy to treat her condition, lupus affects each person differently, and can range in severity from patient to patient,” said Dr. Susan Baker, a rheumatologist in Beverly Hills who treats patients for lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, and a range of autoimmune disorders. “However, it is important to note that lupus is not a form of cancer.”

Autoimmune conditions like lupus result from a hyperactive immune system, where healthy tissue is attacked, leading to a range of conditions and symptoms like inflammation, pain and swelling in the joints, and more serious complications in extreme cases, depending on the diagnosis.

Some of the most common signs and symptoms of lupus include:

Butterfly-shaped rash on the face
Joint stiffness, swelling, or pain
Fever & fatigue
Skin lesions after sun exposure
Confusion and memory loss
Shortness of breath
Chest pain
Dry eyes
White or bluish hands from poor circulation and restricted blood flow

“Although autoimmune disorders can technically affect anyone, lupus is most commonly diagnosed in young women from the ages of 15 to 40,” added Dr. Baker.

The condition is believed to result from a combination of both genetic and environmental factors, such as certain types of medication and exposure to sunlight for patients with a predisposition. In addition to age and sex, Lupus is most common in African American, Hispanic, and Asian patients.

Dr. Susan Baker is board-certified in both internal medicine and rheumatology. She has been providing exceptional and personalized care from her Beverly Hills facility since 2003. She is also a teacher and clinical instructor at Cedars Sinai Hospital and UCLA, David Geffen School of Medicine, respectively.

To learn more about Susan A. Baker MD, Rheumatology & Internal Medicine, please visit, or call (310) 274-7770.

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