First Annual Reach for the Stars Gala to Benefit Rettsyndrome.org

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The gala will benefit Rettsyndrome.org, and the proceeds will support funding for developing promising treatments, and hopefully a cure, for Rett syndrome.

The First Annual Reach for the Stars Gala will be hosted on Wednesday, November 18, 2015 at 6:00 PM at the Four Seasons Hotel Boston. The gala will benefit Rettsyndrome.org, and the proceeds will support funding for developing promising treatments, and hopefully a cure, for Rett syndrome.

The Reach for the Stars Gala will be co-chaired by new Rettsyndrome.org Board Member Kim and her husband Charlie Jacobs of The Boston Bruins and Boston Bruins Foundation. The Jacobs family has an extensive record of philanthropy for the benefit of children with medical needs or who are at-risk. Their commitment to these causes makes them strong advocates for all individuals living with Rett syndrome. The focus of the evening will be on two extraordinary Bostonians, Jane and Michael Joyce, who will be honored at the celebration for their unyielding efforts to Rett syndrome.

“The Gala will certainly help raise much-needed awareness of Rett syndrome.” said Kim Jacobs. “But more importantly, the donations will make a difference by funding cutting-edge research, much of which is taking place in Boston.”

Rettsyndrome.org relies on donations to initiate and fund high-quality, peer-reviewed research in search of treatments and a cure for Rett syndrome.

To learn more about the Reach for the Stars Gala visit http://www.rettsyndrome.org.

ABOUT RETTSYNDROME.ORG
Rettsyndrome.org, a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization, is accelerating research for treatments and a cure for Rett syndrome. As the world’s leading private funder of Rett research, we have funded more than $35 million in peer-reviewed research grants and programs since 2007 while empowering families to make a difference. Visit http://www.rettsyndrome.org to learn more, or call (800) 818-7388 (RETT).

ABOUT RETT SYNDROME (RTT)
Rett syndrome is a rare non-inherited genetic postnatal neurological disorder that occurs almost exclusively in girls and leads to lifelong impairments, affecting nearly every aspect of child’s life: their ability to speak, walk, and eat is effected, seizures develop and scoliosis occurs, and many develop irregular breathing patterns. Those diagnosed with Rett syndrome, about 1 in 10,000 girls, require maximum assistance with basic daily activities. The hallmark sign of Rett syndrome is near constant repetitive hand movements. Cognitive assessment in children with Rett syndrome is complicated, but they understand far more than they can communicate, evidenced by their bright and attentive eyes, and their ability to express a wide spectrum of moods and emotions.

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Megan Betsch
@Rettsyndrome
since: 12/2009
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