Nora Dowd Eisenhower Named a ‘2015 Influencer in Aging’

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PBS’s Next Avenue taps Dowd Eisenhower as a leader who is ‘changing the way we think about aging’

Nora Dowd Eisenhower

Now that many of us are living a long life while carrying debt into our later years, we need to change how we plan for a financially secure retirement.

Next Avenue, an affiliate of PBS, has named Nora Dowd Eisenhower, a longtime advocate for older Americans, among the 50 most influential people who are changing how we perceive aging in America.

Dowd Eisenhower, who is assistant director for the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s Office of Older Americans, joins activist Maria Shriver, cartoonist Roz Chast, NPR correspondent Ina Jaffe, musician Glen Campbell, writer and explorer Dan Buettner and bioethicist Dr. Ezekiel Emanuel on the list of “2015 Influencers in Aging.”

A former resident of Chestnut Hill for more than 20 years, Dowd Eisenhower has focused on financial security for older Americans, working to prevent them from getting scammed and to help them make their money last. This issue has grown ever more vital, as average life expectancy has continued to rise. Recognition among Next Avenue’s influencers – which include thought leaders, executives, writers, artists, researchers, experts and everyday people – helps increase awareness of this important issue.

“Now that many of us are living a long life while carrying debt into our later years, we need to change how we plan for a financially secure retirement,” said Dowd Eisenhower. “Being named an Influencer in Aging validates that message and the mission upon which my fellow influencers and I have focused, which is helping all Americans live longer, safer, healthier lives.”

Honorees were selected by Next Avenue’s editorial team, which assessed hundreds of qualified candidates and consulted with a panel of outside advisers, including experts in health, housing, work, media, philanthropy and gerontology. To be considered for the list, individuals had to be engaged in improving the lives of older adults through their work or by example and did not need to be more than 50 years old. For more information, visit Next Avenue.

Before joining the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, Dowd Eisenhower was the National Council on Aging’s senior vice president of economic security and director of its National Center for Benefits Access. Prior to that, she served as executive director of AARP Pennsylvania and secretary of the Pennsylvania Department of Aging. As secretary, she advised former Gov. Ed Rendell, her fellow cabinet members and Pennsylvania legislators on aging services and related issues, including home-and community-based programs, senior community centers, transportation, protective services and the Program of All-inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE), Pennsylvania’s pharmaceutical benefit program for seniors.

Dowd Eisenhower earned a bachelor’s degree in social sciences from Stony Brook University and then went on to earn a law degree from the Antioch University School of Law, now the David A. Clarke School of Law in Washington, D.C.

To learn more or to connect with Eisenhower, please visit her LinkedIn page.

About Nora Dowd Eisenhower – A longtime advocate for older Americans, Eisenhower took on health care fraud among Medicare beneficiaries while working at the Center of Advocacy for the Rights and Interests of the Elderly as their project director. The assistant director for the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s Office of Older Americans in Washington, D.C., Eisenhower works to empower consumers to help them better manage their economic lives.

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